Petition to Condemn Mock Slave Auctions at JCL Classics Events

For more information and context on this issue, please see Dani Bostick’s detailed post.

Dear Sherwin Little, Mary Pendergraft, & Catherine Sturgill:

We write to express our dismay at the practice of mock slave auctions in the context of Junior Classical League national conventions, state conventions, club meetings, and other topics. We condemn the use of oppression and dehumanization as a source of levity and entertainment in an organization that is often children’s first introduction to Classics. 

We agree with the American Classical League’s May 5 statement against racism and, along with the ACL, we reject “racism and white supremacy in all of their manifestations.” We assume that the JCL, as an affiliate of the ACL, shares these sentiments and is equally committed to the ACL’s commitment that their “ resources, workshops, and other events do not inadvertently promote and further racism, sexism, white supremacy, or any other set of ideas that foster systemic inequities.”

However, in condoning, promoting, holding, and failing to condemn mock slave auctions, JCL-affiliated groups and conventions have created an environment that harms many junior classicists and excludes many other potential classicists. This is not the vision of classics that we want to promote at the secondary or post-secondary level. Individual JCL organizations look to the ACL and JCL for leadership, and they both have a large role in shaping the field and establishing the culture of secondary Classics. They must do better.

We are asking ACL and JCL to: 

  • Apologize for establishing and perpetuating mock slave auctions and acknowledge the harm this has caused generations of students. 
  • Condemn the practice of mock slave auctions for fundraising, classroom instruction, or any other purpose. 
  • Disseminate information to ACL members and JCL sponsors about the harm caused by mock slave auctions and, more broadly, using slavery and other forms of oppression as a source of humor. 
  • Prevent future harm by adding a prohibition against mock slave auctions to the JCL governing documents as soon as possible and releasing immediate guidance that informs stakeholders that they are harmful and inappropriate in any context, including (especially) the classroom.  

As students and instructors at the secondary and post-secondary level and other members of the classics community, we ask you to consider making these changes that will make our field a more inclusive place for everyone.

Sincerely,

Please scroll down to add your name to the petition

Note to signatories: thank you for signing this petition! We also encourage you to do some or all of the following:

  • Write an individual letter of concern to leaders of the ACL and JCL: Mary Pendergraft, President ACL (president@aclclassics.org), Sherwin Little, Executive Director (littles@aclclassics.org), and Catherine Sturgill, Chair of the JCL (publicrelations@ncjl.org)
  • Write a letter as a JCL chapter
  • Ask your department chair / administrator/ equity coordinator or applicable central office leader to write a letter or issue a public statement
  • Pass this letter on to like-minded colleagues (even outside of the field)

Signatories

Dani Bostick
Amy Pistone Gonzaga University
Madelyn Torchin
Aven McMaster
Assistant Professor, Thorneloe University at Laurentian
Kevin M. Perry
David Perry University of Minnesota
Jennifer Lewton-Yates
Asst. Prof. of Classics, Millsaps College
Sarah Teets University of Virginia
Liv Mariah Yarrow
Associate Professor, Classics, Brooklyn College
Jane Sancinito
Visiting Assistant Professor, Oberlin College
Isaac Hoffman Cornell Grad Student
Rebecca Kennedy Denison University
Lindsey Mazurek
Assistant Professor, Department of History, University of Oregon
Victoria Austen-Perry University of Winnipeg
Graham Butler PhD, UBC
Nancy Rabinowitz
Professor of Literature Hamilton College
Thomas Lecaque Grand View University
Preston Bannard
Classics teacher, Groton School
Natalie Daifotis
Graduate Student, UMass Amherst
Judith P Hallett
Deborah Lyons
Dept of Classics, Miami University
Leah Bernardo-Ciddio
PhD Candidate, IPCAA, University of Michigan
Justin Slocum Bailey
Alex Claman Texas Tech University
Emma Remsberg
Timothy Joseph College of the Holy Cross
Sarah Galatioto-Ruff Teacher
Lillian Sellers Tucker High School
Tom Di Giulio
Danielle Kellogg Brooklyn College
Courtney Monahan
Duke University; Durham Academy (Durham, NC)
Wynter Douglas
Lynnea Kaylor
Student & Mentor, Kaylor Ashuvyahu Center for Classical Learning
Barbara Gold
Hamilton College (emerita)
Rosanna Lauriola
Adjunct Assistant prof. of Classics, Randolph-Macon College (VA)
Patricia Kim
Kassandra Miller
Visiting Assistant Professor, Bard College
Danielle Martin
Middle School Latin/Seattle Academy
David J. Wright
Lecturer, Fordham University
Arum Park
Assistant Professor of Classics, University of Arizona
Tori Lee Duke University
Eush Tayco
Melissa Funke
Assistant Professor, University of Winnipeg
Aneirin Pendragon
Allene M. Seet
Jennifer Gerrish College of Charleston
Michael Goyette
Instructor of Classics, Eckerd College
Matt Gibbs
Associate Professor, University of Winnipeg
Erin Moodie
Assistant Professor, Purdue University
Phebe duPont Haverford College
Molly Harris
University of Wisconsin-Madison
Brenda Fields
Gregory P. Stringer
Burlington (MA) Public High School
Dimitri Nakassis
University of Colorado Boulder
Samuel Flores College of Charleston
Hannah Culik-Baird
Assistant Professor Boston University
Hayley Barnett
Steven Mondloch UMass Amherst
Brandon Conley
Michigan State University
Jay Fisher
Professor Department of Classics Rutgers University
Heather Galante
Marcia Smith, Ph.D.
Joy Reeber University of Arkansas
Joy Eliot
Former course lead, North Carolina Virtual Public School (disabled). B.A. First Class Cambridge, M.A. Harvard.
Lisa Maurizio Bates College
Stephanie McCarter
The University of the South (Sewanee)
Brittany Johnson The Ursuline School
Grace Gillies
Visiting Lecturer, Bates College
Simon DeSantis
Gray Alexander
Clara Bosak-Schroeder
Assistant Professor, UIUC
Kathryn H. Stutz
Graduate student, Johns Hopkins University
Anatole Mori University of Missouri
Christine Ellis
Amber Kearns
Britta Ager Colorado College
Jacqueline Church
Kathryn Topper University of Washington
Yurie Hong
Gustavus Adolphus College
Marina Haworth
North Hennepin Community College
Jameson Minto
Diane Warne Anderson UMass Boston
Jacquelyn Wilkins
Teacher, EC Glass High School & Former Director, Virginia Governor’s Latin Academy
Sarah E. Bond
Associate Prof. of History, University of Iowa
Neel Smith
Max Rohleder
Sydney Preston
Graduate Student, UMass Amherst
Alice Bradley
Tom Hendrickson
Stanford Online High School
Matt Mitchell
Elijah J. Mears
adam williams
Alicia Matz Boston University
Diana Ng
Forrester Hammer
Graduate student, UMass Amherst
Dr. Liz Gloyn
Senior Lecturer in Classics, Royal Holloway, University of London
Dr Gabriel Bodard
Reader in Digital Classics, University of London
Andrew Scott Villanova University
Shannon DuBois Boston University
Katherine Wasdin
Assistant Professor, University of Maryland
Alexandra Pappas
San Francisco State University
Christopher Polt Boston College
Liliana Schaefer
Dominic Machado College of the Holy Cross
Ian Nurmi Boston University
Joseph Stern UMass Amherst
Paul Brucia Breitenfeld Boston University
Rachel Hart
Jacqui Bloomberg
Upper School Latin Teacher at Dana Hall in Wellesley, MA
Sarah Stroup
University of Washington, Seattle
Deborah Kamen University of Washington
Kristina Sherburne
Anwar Omeish
2014 Virginia JCL President
Ningyin Zhao
Eli Williams
Joseph Farrell
Emily Damiano
Ruby Blondell
Professor Emerita, University of Washington
Amit Shilo
Assistant Professor of Classics, UCSB
Mary Lou Burke
Woodrow Wilson High School
Boyce Collins
North Carolina A&T State University
Catherine Connors University of Washington
Anthony Corbeill University of Virginia
Jennifer Judge Gonzaga Preparatory
Wayne Miller
Latin Teacher, Garfield HS, Seattle, WA
Molly Stevens UGA
Stephen Hinds
University of Washington, Seattle
Jackie Murray University of Kentucky
Mali Skotheim
Postdoctoral Fellow, The Warburg Institute
Lauren Donovan Ginsberg University of Cincinnati
Jennifer Ebbeler UT Austin
Roberta Stewart
Professor, Dartmouth College
K. Scarlett Kingsley Agnes Scott College
Ellen O’Gorman University of Bristol
Anna Henriques
Francesca Tronchin
Dr. Francesca Tronchin
Addenbrooke Classical Academy
Kendra Eshleman
Boston College; MD JCL 1990-91
Anise K. Strong
Associate Professor, Western Michigan University
Jason Nethercut USF
Julie Hruby Dartmouth College
Peter Meineck New York University
Ruth Scodel
The University of Michigan
Kyler Laycock
David Kaufman
Associate Professor of Classics and Philosophy, Transylvania University
John Hyland
Christopher Newport University
Molly Jones-Lewis
Lecturer Ancient Studies Dept. UMBC; VA JCL student 1995-9
Susann Lusnia
Associate Professor & Chair, Tulane University
Joan Romanosky JCL sponsor
Michael McOsker
Ohio Wesleyan University
Kristen Ehrhardt
Associate Professor of classics, John Carroll University
Marisa Alimento
Latin Teacher/Coordinator@ Crossroads School, Santa Monica
Allison Emmerson Tulane University
Ian Lockey
Friends select school Latin teacher
Ashleigh Fata
Konnor Clark PhD
Tom Hawkins Ohio State
Ulrike Krotscheck
The Evergreen State College
Sarah Brucia Breitenfeld
Graduate Student, University of Washington
Elin Rummel
Seattle Academy of Arts and Sciences
Dana Woell
Lisa Mignone
Kira Jones Emory University
Michaela Downing
Kelly P. Dugan University of Georgia
Steven Ellis University of Cincinnati
Sarah Levin-Richardson
Assistant Prof. of Classics, University of Washington
Alexander Beecroft
University of South Carolina
Ruby Blondell University of Washington
Priscilla Scofield
Roosevelt High School, Seattle
Nicolas P. Gross Retired Classicist
Elizabeth Kosmetatou
University of Illinois – Springfield
Erin Walcek Averett
Associate Professor, Creighton University
Katherine Blouin University of Toronto
Hallie Franks New York University
T. H. M. Gellar-Goad Wake Forest University
Briana Titus teacher & JCL sponsor
Zoé Elise Thomas
University of Texas at Austin
Marian Makins Temple University
Taz Hinkle
Melanie Subacus
Robert Amstutz
Susan Herder
Jason Albaugh
Laura Hudec
Emily Goetz
Classical Magnet School (former), JCL club advisor (former)
Clayton Schroer
University of Illinois/Colorado College
Arti Mehta
Gina Soter University of Michigan
Ellen Sassenberg Century High School
Sara Myers
Professor of Classics, UVA
Heather Waddell
Chair, Greek & Roman Studies (Concordia College, Moorhead MN)
Lizzy Ten-Hove
PhD Candidate, Stanford University
Catherine Reed
Dulaney High School, Baltimore County
Daniel Bostick Social Sciences Teacher
Lea Cline
Associate Professor, Illinois State University
Leigh Anne Lieberman The Claremont Colleges
Jack Kanoof
Assistant Professor, University of Virginia
Raymon Johnson
Emma Hanley
Tom Elliott
Associate Director for Digital Programs and Senior Research Scholar, NYU/ISAW
Jessica Rothwell Arizona State University
Bill Beck
Indiana University, Bloomington
Christina Vester
Associate Professor, University of Waterloo
Mary Gilbert
Birmingham Southern College
Mike de Brauw
Associate Professor of Classics, North Central College (Naperville, IL)
Vincent Price
Stephanie Wong Brown University
Sarah J. Miller Gilman School
Sara Priebe
Shelley Haley Hamilton College
Julia Fink
Geffen Academy at UCLA
Addison Lee
Parker McClary Geffen Academy
Phoebe Fischer Geffen Academy
Lucius Farha Geffen Academy
Arushi Khare Geffen Academy
Bianca Baron

Statements on the Paideia Institute

On October 1, 2019, the Sportula Collective published a statement detailing the experiences of many of their members at programs run by the Paideia Institute. The note that:

The Sportula believes that the Paideia Institute and its affiliated programs create an environment that is hostile to people of color, women, students from working-class backgrounds, the LGBTQ community, and other marginalized groups.

The leadership of the Classics and Social Justice group believes these accounts and stands in solidarity with the brave people who came forward to share their stories in an attempt to effect change at Paideia. We also recognize that the factors that contributed to this toxic culture are not unique to the Paideia Institute but are a pervasive issue within the field and we are committed to addressing these more pervasive issues as well as this specific situation.

We do not find that the responses offered by Paideia leadership have been sufficient or that they have adequately acknowledged the harm that their organization has done. Because of that, we heartily second the calls to action recommended by the Sportula:

  • Spread the word: Alert other community members, students, and peers to potential discrimination from the Paideia Institute.
  • Redirect support: Opt to support organizations in the field that are inclusive, safe spaces, and recommend such organizations to The Sportula and your community members.
  • Divest: Encourage your university to reconsider its relationship with Paideia.

In an attempt to amplify the voices of people who have been marginalized, exploited, and otherwise mistreated by people affiliated with the Paideia Institute, we are collecting the different statements that have been issued in response to the original Sportula statement. If we have missed any, please let us know.

SCS Board Letter to the Paideia Institute

CAAS Board of Directors letter to The Paideia Institute

ACL Statement concerning the Paideia Institute

Statement from CNSC GRECOLATINOVIVO regarding the publication on Medium by Sportula on October 1 and 2, addressing the Paideia Institute

Liz Butterworth, In Support of the Sportula’s Statement on the Paideia Institute

Gregory Stringer, Ending my association with Paideia

Bryan Whitchurch, Whitchurch and the Paideia Institute, October 2019

An older letter, but one that addresses some of the same fundamental issues, written by instructors affiliated with Paideia, though many have since ended their association

Umass statement.jpg

And finally, here is a thread breaking down some of the problems with the statement issued by Paideia:

 

Teaching Classics in US Prison Settings

Good news! The volume growing out of CSJ panels and workshops, Teaching Classics in US Prison Settings (co-edited by Emilio Capetinni [UCSB] and Nancy Rabinowitz [Hamilton College]) has been accepted by Routledge.

It will appear in the series co-edited by Rabinowitz and Fiona McHardy, Classics In and Out of the Academy: Classical Pedagogy in the Twenty-First Century. Please consider submitting a proposal for consideration to f.mchardy@roehampton.ac.uk or nrabinow@hamilton.edu. Here is a description of the series:

This series explores the ways in which the study of antiquity can enrich the lives of diverse populations in the twenty-first century. The series covers two distinct, but interrelated topics: 1) ways in which classicists can engage new audiences within the academy by embedding inclusivity and diversity in university teaching practices, curricula, and assessments, and 2) the relevance of Classics to learners from the most marginalized social strata (i.e. the incarcerated, refugees, those suffering from mental illness).

CFP: Carthartic History, deadline: Nov. 12th

Conference: Cathartic History

University of West Georgia, Carrollton, GA
February 25-27, 2021

 

The aim of this conference and the edited collection that will result is to propose Aristotelian catharsis as a new lens for historical inquiry. The project aims to do so, specifically, through the study of cathartic history as a phenomenon in the Greco-Roman Mediterranean and in the field of Classical history today. In the process, the project will serve as an example of the productive application of catharsis to the study of the past, and thus a model for other fields of historical research.

While the study of the past as a healing experience is not entirely new, no uniform vocabulary exists at this time for talking about cathartic history. Rather, scholars who have written to elicit an emotional response from their audiences about the past, or who have chosen to consider their own emotional response to the past, have largely done so in passing or in popularly oriented publications, rather than using that emotional response as a bona fide category of historical analysis in and of itself. And yet, the historian’s selection of topics of research, both in the ancient world and in the historical profession today, is often motivated by personal experiences, broadly defined. This project aims to show that thinking about the past as a cathartic experience whether for us as historians, and/or for the ancient historians we study, and/or for our modern audiences, provides a new bridge for a productive academic dialogue of the past with the present.

Proposals are invited for 20-minute papers that consider (but are not limited to) the following questions:

  • How might we apply the Aristotelian theory of catharsis to Greek and Roman historians?
  • In what ways might the lens of catharsis enrich our reading of narratives of trauma (whether personal or literary or national) in the ancient sources?
  • Are we pursuing catharsis in our own research whenever we focus on topics of personal relevance?
  • Is historical research a cathartic experience? Should it be?
  • In what ways could thinking about history through the lens of catharsis intersect with the increased interest in social justice within the field of Classics?

Please submit abstracts of 300-500 words by November 12, 2019 to Nadya Williams, nwilliam@westga.edu

LSA Collegiate Postdoctoral Fellowship Program at the University of Michigan. Deadline: Oct. 1 2019.

LSA Collegiate Postdoctoral Fellowship Program at the University of Michigan
This is a two-year post doc aimed at recruiting and retaining exceptional early career scholars committed to building a diverse, equitable, and inclusive intellectual community. The two-year fellowship program provides early career scholars with dedicated research time, mentorship, teaching experience, travel funding, and professional development opportunities to prepare them for a possible tenure-track appointment at the University of Michigan. The department wishes in particular to recruit and support young scholars from underrepresented cultural and economic backgrounds leading to a tenure track hire in Classical Studies. The application deadline is Oct. 1, 2019. Here is the link for the application: https://lsa.umich.edu/ncid/fellowships-awards/lsa-collegiate-postdoctoral-fellowship.html

Candidates whose scholarship, teaching, and service will contribute to the diversity, equity, and inclusion goals of LSA are encouraged to apply. Applicants in Classical Studies are encouraged to identify potential mentors on the faculty and contact them before the deadline for advice on preparation of materials.

Applicants are encouraged to write either to Basil Dufallo (dufallo@umich.edu) or to Artemis Leontis, Chair of the Department (aleontis@umich.edu), for any advice regarding the application letter, diversity statement, and narrative on the application.

CFP: “Res Difficiles: A Conference On Challenges and Pathways for Addressing Inequity” (**May 15th 2020**, UMW)

CALL FOR PAPERS
Res Difficiles:  A Conference On
Challenges and Pathways for Addressing Inequity 
In the Ancient Greek and Roman World

 

Organizers: Hannah Čulík-Baird (Boston University) and Joseph Romero (University of Mary Washington)
Date: **MAY 15th**, 2020
Place: Campus of the University of Mary Washington (Fredericksburg, Virginia), HCC 136
*Please note that the date of this conference has been changed so as not to coincide with CAMWS*

One of the great benefits of the shift from a pedagogue-centered to a student-aware or student-centered classroom is that we listen more attentively to how our students experience the content of what we read.  A decided strength of Classical Studies is the simultaneous proximity and distance—temporally, geographically, ideologically—of the ancient Greek and Roman world. That distance is felt more keenly when potentially difficult subjects (res difficiles) in our readings—domination, inequity, violence both sexual and otherwise—present themselves for inspection. Often the underlying source of the dissonance or disconnect is the distance in our perceptions of social justice. 

 In a conference held on the campus of the University of Mary Washington (Fredericksburg, Virginia), we examine the challenges presented by this curriculum with students who are increasingly more diverse in gender identity, race, ethnicity, income, family structure, and more. We invite contributions from professors, graduate students, teachers, activists, and any interested in the issues under discussion. And while the society of our conference will examine pedagogical issues, we hope also to dilate outward to broader issues in education and society from (a) the current and future roles of Classics and the humanities in K-12 and higher education to (b) the ultimate goals of education.

 Our keynote speaker will be Dani Bostick (@danibostick) who teaches Latin in Winchester, VA, and who has garnered a national reputation as a writer, teacher, and advocate for victims of sexual violence.  Learn more at danibostick.net.

 We hope the conference will be attended by as many as possible in person, but a number (limited only by our subscription capacity), will be able to attend digitally. With the permission of the individual presenters, the proceedings of the conference will be live-tweeted on the conference hashtag (#resdiff).

 Abstracts of 350 words should be sent electronically to Joseph Romero (jromero@umw.edu) by January 10, 2020.  Papers will be 20-25 minutes long with coordinated discussion at the end of each session.  Any questions regarding abstract submission may be addressed to Professor Romero or Professor Čulík-Baird (culik@bu.edu). For more information see the conference website (http://cas.umw.edu/clpr/resdifficilesconference/).

Res Difficiles – Call for Papers