Classics and Social Justice at CAAS 2017 (Oct. 5-7) NY

See below Classics and Social Justice and Women’s Classical Caucus at
CAAS (The Classical Association of the Atlantic States) 2017

October 5-7, 2017
New York Marriott East Side
New York City, New York

Thursday 8-10 pm
Panel Two: Classics and Social Activism
Amanda Gregory, Morrison-Beard School, and Nancy Rabinowitz, presiding
Somatic Sociology and Sexual Assault: Activism Through Nonnus
Nikolas Oktaba, Gates Scholar, Cambridge University
A Capstone Elective Course in the Bard Prison Initiative
Nancy Felson, University of Georgia
Greek Tragedy for Social Reform
Melinda Powers, John Jay College of Criminal Justice/The Graduate Center, CUNY
Registering for Expose Your Professor
Nancy Rabinowitz

Friday 8:00 am–10:00 am
Panel Three: Feminism and Classics Revisited: A Panel in Commemoration of Barbara McManus. Sponsored by the Women’s Classical Caucus
T.H.M. Gellar-Goad, Wake Forest University, and Nancy Rabinowitz, presiding
Twenty-Five years of Feminist Theory and the Classics: Now What?
Barbara K. Gold
Feminist Activism in Australasian Classics: Progress and Challenges
Maxine Lewis, University of Auckland
Helen and Penelope: A New Queer and Intertextual Feminist Approach
Rachel H. Lesser, Gettysburg College

Paper Session A: Gender and Power in Greek and Roman Culture and Society
Jessica Anderson and Frederick Booth, presiding
Decision is Difficult: Medical Decision-Making in the Hippocratic Corpus
Katherine van Schaik, Harvard University
Demagogia in Context
Aaron Hershkowitz, Rutgers University
Small Sacrifices: Miniature Altars and Household Religion in Hellenistic Sicily
Andrew Tharler, Bryn Mawr College
The Disappearance of Isis on Imperial Coinage
Elizabeth Mellen, Rutgers University

10:30 am–1:00 pm Panel Six:
Celebrating and Contextualizing Barbara McManus’s The Drunken Duchess of Vassar: Grace Harriet Macurdy, Pioneering Feminist Classical Scholar (Ohio State University Press, 2017)
Judith P. Hallett and Maria Marsilio, presiding
Presentations on the lives and works of Grace Harriet Macurdy (1866–1946) and Barbara McManus (1942–2015) by Sarah B. Pomeroy, Hunter College and the Graduate Center, CUNY; Donald Lateiner, Ohio Wesleyan University; Barbara Olsen, Vassar College; Robert Pounder, Vassar College; Eugene O’Connor, Ohio State University Press; Judith P. Hallett; and Christopher Stray, Swansea University and Institute of Classical Studies, London

Friday 2:30 pm–5:30 pm
Panel Nine: Theater of War: Dramatic Reading and Discussion of Sophocles’ Philoctetes
Thomas Falkner and John H. Starks, Jr., presiding
Introductory Remarks: Thomas Falkner and Bryan Doerries, Director, Theater of War
Performance of selections from Sophocles’ Philoctetes. Actors will be announced in September.
Responses: Shelley Haley; Sergios Paschalis, Harvard University; Victoria Pedrick and John H. Starks, Jr.
Facilitated Audience Discussion and Closing Remarks

9:30 pm Meeting of the newly formed SCS Affiliated Group for Classics and Social Justice, Nancy Rabinowitz, convener. All attendees are welcome.

Saturday
7:15 am–8:15 am Please join members of the Women’s Classical Caucus at a breakfast to find out more about the WCC and its programs, in particularly its longstanding mentoring initiative and a new initiative focused on combatting sexual harassment.

10:30 am–1:00 pm Panel Sixteen: Racism and Language in Classics Today
Sponsored by the Multiculturalism, Race, and Ethnicity in Classics Consortium
Aaron Hershkowitz and David Wright, Rutgers University, presiding
From “Greeks, Romans, and Barbarians” to “Race and the Classics”
Jackie Murray, University of Kentucky
“It’s What He Intended”: Translation, Authorial Intent and Racism in Classics
Shelley Haley
Positionality and Transitivity: The Syntax and Semantics of Intentional Action and Inclusion in the Language of Diversity Statements on Classics Websites
Kelly Dugan, University of Georgia

 

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An Open Letter to UChicago History Department

Read the letter to the UChicago History department regarding recent problematic statements on white supremacy in medieval studies by Professor Brown which endanger Professor Kim.

https://www.dropbox.com/s/mk2ifzv34803zlo/chicago_open_%20letter.pdf?dl=0

If you wish, sign the letter on the following signature page showing your support.

https://docs.google.com/document/d/1zKRLYSuifXs-vyTFB2420i-jAUPTyzpEajL15IeopR4/edit

LSA Collegiate Postdoctoral Fellowship Program

LSA Collegiate Postdoctoral Fellowship Program
Fellowship Period: August 1, 2018 – July 31, 2020

Application Deadline: Monday, October 2, 2017

The College of Literature, Science, and the Arts (LSA) at the University of Michigan invites applicants to our LSA Collegiate Postdoctoral Fellowship Program. 

This major initiative is aimed at promoting an inclusive scholarly environment, recruiting and retaining exceptional early career scholars, and supporting outstanding scholars committed to building a diverse, equitable, and inclusive intellectual community. The two-year fellowship program provides early career scholars with dedicated research time, mentorship, teaching experience, travel funding, and professional development opportunities to prepare them for possible tenure-track appointments in LSA. 

Candidates whose scholarship, teaching, and service will contribute to the diversity, equity, and inclusion goals of LSA are encouraged to apply. Applicants in Classical Studies are encouraged to identify potential mentors on the faculty and contact them before the deadline for advice on preparation of materials; any emails should be copied to Ian Fielding (fieldian@umich.edu). 

Eligibility:

LSA review committees will evaluate applicants in all eligible fields according to their potential for success in an academic career and potential to contribute to higher education through their demonstrated commitment to diversity in scholarship and service. To be eligible, applicants’ doctoral degrees should be completed between January 1, 2015 and July 1, 2018.  

Additional program and application information can be found on LSA’s Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion website: http://lsa.umich.edu/lsa/about/diversity–equity-and-inclusion/lsa-collegiate-

postdoctoral-fellowship-program.html; Inquiries may be directed to lsacollegiatepostdoc@umich.edu.

#ClassicsSoWhite

Herakles statue.jpg

Terracotta column-krater, c. 360-350 BCE (The Met). An artist paints a statue of Herakles. The skin color of the statue is not represented as reflecting the skin color of the living figures.

By Hilary Lehmann.

The other day I was listening to an episode of the NPR podcast “Code Switch” covering the historical and political contexts of Charlottesville. The hosts, Shereen Marisol Miraji and Gene Demby, brought on a Republican operative, Alex Conant, who claimed that the president’s refusal to come down firmly against white supremacy could cause irrevocable damage to the Republican party. I listened to this with incredulity, particularly when Conant claimed that he had worked for “a lot of Republicans” and had “never heard any sort of racist sentiment at all.” But when he added that most Republicans “bemoan the fact that we underperform with minority voters,” I was shaken, despite having heard this sentiment from Republicans countless times before. Having just returned from a productive and invigorating workshop focusing on promoting the study of Classics, I had, even more than usual, the exact same concern on my mind.

The overwhelming whiteness of Classics, both faculty and majors, as well as the necessity of disrupting this racial disparity, has been well documented (and now, Denise McCoskey’s excellent essay). With regards to the Republicans, the reason why few people of color vote for them is laughably obvious. When Demby asked why the Republicans had such a hard time obtaining the support of minorities, Conant responded “well, obviously, episodes like this weekend [the white supremacist rally in Charlottesville] do not help with the Republican brand.” Republican policy and messaging is overtly, intentionally racist: it’s pro-police, anti-refugee, pro-gun, anti-welfare, and anti-immigrant. As much as Republican operatives like Conant like to cry ignorance, the fact that 90% of Republican voters are white is not an accident or a mystery. White supremacy is essential to the Republican ethos.

So if, in the case of Republicans, the answer to their diversity problem is obvious, could the same be said about Classics? When we wring our hands and bemoan the scarcity of minorities in our classes and conferences, is there an open secret that we are keeping from ourselves? Is Classics intentionally, explicitly excluding people of color, keeping our towers ivory? I know that some will find this association between the field of Classics and the Republican party hurtful, since most of the Classicists I’ve studied and worked with have been liberal, and I do not mean to call anyone out specifically. Nevertheless, within the discipline, I perceive a sense of complacency with, or perhaps resignation to, the status quo. We know it’s a problem, but I don’t see us making a real, concerted effort to change it.

I find this quote from Mathura Umachandran’s essay extremely telling:

“unless you can credibly defend the idea that black and brown people are either not interested or not smart enough to study ancient Greece and Rome, then structural oppression and discrimination have to be a plausible part of any account for this fact.”

I’ve heard my colleagues wonder, mystified, why Black students don’t want to take their classes, as if the problem lay with the students rather than the professors. Nobody is telling students of color that they’re not interested in taking Greek and Latin, that they don’t want to major in Classics (notwithstanding the convenient myth that minority students are only interested in the STEM fields) – nobody except us. Classics has the advantage of historical perspective; by its nature, Classics is incredibly chronologically, geographically, and ethnographically diverse. Our transhistorical perspective makes the artificiality of the East-West separation obvious: we study authors from modern Turkey, Syria, Libya, and Egypt, as well as modern Greece and Italy. As Classicists, we know that the capital of the Roman Empire was located in modern Istanbul for a thousand years. We know that the works of Plato, Aristotle, Galen, Hippocrates, and Euclid were translated and studied for centuries by Islamic scholars, without whom much of the Greek philosophical, mathematical, and medical thought upon which the myth of Western Civilization is based would have been lost. When we don’t talk about the inherent diversity of Classics more, when we go on and on about the “foundations of Western tradition” instead of pointing out that our field necessarily destabilizes the myth of the west, we are performing an act of active erasure, of intentional whitewashing. When we rewrite the history of Classics to exclude Asia and Africa, when we continue to propagate the narrative of a Western tradition rooted in the Greco-Roman past, we are the ones telling non-white students that Classics is not for them.

In my classes, I make a big deal about the historical construction of racial categories and try to impress upon my students that the Greeks and Romans were not white and should not be considered as belonging to the same racial or ethnic category as white Americans, because modern American whiteness is a construct of our unique, racist, historical circumstances. This message is a response not only to neo-Nazi agitators and political strategists who have appropriated classical imagery and thought, claiming to be the rightful heirs of the Greco-Roman traditions, but also to Bernard Knox’s description of the ancient Greeks as the “oldest dead white European males.” Knox attributes this epithet to “modern multicultural and radical feminist criticism” as a mark of the irrelevance of Classics, but doubles down in support of this characterization with the strange assertion that “they were undoubtedly white or, to be exact, a sort of Mediterranean olive color” (26). What could reveal the situatedness of race more strikingly than the assumption that white and olive are the same color?

Maybe I’m just arguing with a straw man – Knox’s book was published in 1993 and my students are unlikely either to have heard of it or to have encountered the white nationalists of the internet shouting about European heritage. But it is generally true that if my students have heard of Classics at all, it’s been indelibly linked in their minds with whiteness, whether because of images of austere temples and statues or because our society assumes everything old (even imaginarily old) is white. And so I lay out the evidence, every class I teach, for the diversity of the Greek world (Asia Minor was always a part of it! In the Hellenistic period it included North Africa and vast stretches of Asia! The Greeks were certainly xenophobic but not because of skin color!). I teach about how people of color and white women strove to enter academia when it excluded all but upper class white men, how their efforts gradually opened higher education to all people. They found something of themselves in the study of Classics.

But at the same time as I’ve been proselytizing the historical diversity of Classics and Classicists, I am aware that I’ve intentionally elided the equally real historical use of classical precedents to promote slavery, racial profiling, and sexism. In a way, to claim that Classics is, by nature, egalitarian is disingenuous – the discipline’s very name is a testament to its exclusivity. Classics is predicated on the notion of hierarchy, that some things are just better than others. The striving of people of color and white women to gain access to the study of Classics has as its obvious corollary the fact that it was their exclusion that made Classics an elite discipline, a desirable object of study. They were told they weren’t good enough for Classics, and that’s what made them work so hard to be included. The narrative of the Western Tradition is both untrue and true. It’s untrue because there’s never been an unbroken line of descent between Greco-Roman antiquity and modern Anglo-European identity, but also true because over the last several centuries, Classicists have manufactured and sold the world on their idea of Western Tradition, an inheritance they made up from the best and worst parts of the past. This myth-made-real isn’t going anywhere unless we confront it and the damages it has caused.

Talking to our students about the dark side of Classics’ whiteness is much harder and less pleasant than championing its diversity, but I think it’s necessary to be frank about the ways in which the elitism of Classics has been used to exclude and oppress. Perhaps we won’t be able to convince everyone – I don’t think we’re going to be able to “well, actually” the white supremacists; as Mary Beard’s constant Sisyphean battles with racist trolls demonstrate, the acolytes of a monochromatic classical past do not respond well to expertise or to evidence that falls outside of their carefully curated set of talking points. But what we can do is be upfront with our students about the dark history of Classics and our intentional goal of emphasizing the diversity rather than the elitism ancient Greek and Roman cultures. And to get to that place, we need to make sure that we, as educators, are all on the same page. We need to have these conversations with each other

Of course, it’s hard for those of us who are white to talk about race. Growing up in America, we’re taught that it’s racist to talk about race, that we should be colorblind. A lot of Classicists are socially awkward, anyway, and have perhaps internalized a kind of gentility that renders talking about worldly matters like race too gauche. I noticed this when I was on the job market the last two years, struggling over the Diversity Statement, wondering why it was so hard to just articulate that we need more people of color in this field or we risk collapsing into an echo chamber. There’s a lot of frustration surrounding the Diversity Statement – nobody seems to know what it’s for, either on the part of the applicants or sometimes even the hiring committees. Before we even talk to our students, we need to have a conversation among ourselves about why the Diversity Statement is required – we need to see it as more than just an HR requirement, to get to a place where the schools that are hiring, and the candidates they’re considering, are truly, deeply, from the heart committed to decolonizing Classics.

CANE 2017: “How We Can Make a Difference: Classics, Social Justice and Outreach”

By Dominic Machado and Roberta Stewart.

On July 11 in Providence, RI, we held an hour-long workshop at the Classical Association of New England Summer Institute, called “How We Can Make a Difference: Classics, Social Justice and Outreach.” We hoped to start a conversation about how we as teachers can use the study of antiquity to engage with diverse populations and how our interactions with these populations can enrich the study of Classics. We are glad to report that the event was a success. The workshop had more than thirty participants, roughly half of the Summer Institute’s attendees.

The workshop as advertised in the CANE Summer Institute Brochure:

This workshop will be a discussion of how we as teachers can use the study of antiquity to engage with diverse populations and how our interactions with these populations can enrich our study of the subject. We will focus on what we as classicists can bring to the most marginalized social strata (e.g. minorities, the incarcerated, war veterans, those suffering from disabilities, etc.) as well as how we can work to include the perspectives of such groups in the study of the Classics. The workshop will feature a brief introduction to the Classics and Social Justice initiative as well as two short presentations that will outline our outreach experiences with war veterans and minority groups and share ways to get involved in similar initiatives. The rest of the time will allow participants to share their own experiences working with such populations or to ask questions about getting involved in their own outreach initiatives.

We began the workshop by providing a brief introduction to the Classics and Social Justice initiative and its goals. This was followed by two short presentations in which we discussed our own outreach experiences and offered some thoughts on how to get involved in similar initiatives. Dominic discussed how classicists can make a difference in the country’s educational crisis. He stressed that our knowledge of Latin can be a powerful tool for improving literacy and bringing new educational opportunities to underserved minority communities. He noted that it was essential that this outreach be combined with efforts to make our field more attuned to the unique experiences of these communities (e.g. reading the Aeneid as refugee narrative). Such perspectives are not only tremendously useful for underserved populations, but will produce new and exciting ideas in our field.

Roberta then shared her experiences teaching a class at Dartmouth College called “War Stories.” The course required students to interview a veteran and write a response paper detailing their interaction as a part of their final project. The results showed just how powerful outreach can be. Roberta read excerpts from several final papers which revealed how transformative the experience of interviewing a veteran was for her students. Their preconceived notions of what it meant to be a former soldier were completely shattered. Even more importantly, the responses that Roberta received from veterans were similar in tone; they appreciated the sensitivity and patience of the students who interviewed them and thoroughly enjoyed the opportunity to share their story.

The second half of the workshop took the form of an open discussion. Participants were given the opportunity to share their own experiences working with underserved populations or to ask questions about getting involved in their own outreach initiatives. The discussion was lively, informative and productive. Teachers talked about the barriers that they faced in trying to do outreach in the past. Others responded to these concerns by discussing creative solutions they found to bypass the administrative red-tape that prevented them from taking part in such endeavors. Though the conversation was very wide-ranging, there was one common thread that ran throughout: the participants wanted to learn more about outreach. In fact, the participants encouraged us to conduct a follow-up session at CANE annual meeting this coming March. We are currently putting together a panel proposal for the meeting – we welcome any submissions or suggestions from blog readers – and we hope to continue our discussion about outreach soon!

ON RACE AND MEDIEVAL STUDIES: A Collective Statement by Medievalists of Color

[Cross-posted from the Medievalists of Color website. Thanks to Jonathan Hsy () for bringing it to our attention.]

August 2017

Medieval studies is increasingly acknowledging realities of race and racism in the profession—reflected in everything from the call to recognize that racism is inherent in the very use of the term “Anglo-Saxon”; to Richard Spencer and the so-called alt-right’s cooptation of Western European medieval studies to buttress their white supremacist ideology; to concerns about the exploitation of Hawaiian culture in the International Society of Anglo-Saxonists’ conference currently underway in Honolulu. These issues have arisen most visibly since the International Medieval Congress at Leeds in July 2017 with individual and collective calls for structural change in the profession and its culture.

Medievalists of Color is a fellowship of scholars who study the early, high, and late Middle Ages across the disciplines and who identify as persons of color from a variety of national and cultural backgrounds. We, the Medievalists of Color, find it necessary to offer a collective response that advocates for a more inclusive, productive, and world-improving medieval studies.

If the recent controversies in medieval studies have seemed shocking, that shock derives simply from the truth of how uneven and disparate our realities are within the field. A tasteless joke about skin color that inaugurated the 2017 Leeds keynote plenary on “Otherness” illustrated this disparity all too well. Those who object to the attention given to a single joke about race fail to understand that for medievalists of color, this joke is not an isolated event. It is a symptom of a culture, both in medieval studies and in the wider world, in which we regularly hear jokes about our appearances, accents, names, and experiences. Indeed, such jokes frequently escalate into mockery, threats, and even physical violence. Opening the plenary session on the problematic thematic strand “Otherness,” the joke established an unwelcoming environment from the outset. Likewise, the open acceptance of such racist jokes has proliferated in various social media, listservs, and other spaces in which medievalists congregate. This then is not merely a sensationalized incident, but rather a normalized speech act that indicates a pervasive and deeply problematic professional and social climate.

Creating and maintaining a climate that is welcoming to all requires intention and deliberation. Drawing from extensive administrative experience in higher education in the UK and Australia as well as several traditions of philosophical inquiry, Sara Ahmed attests to how professional environments and intellectual cultures engage in a “politics of stranger making” that reveals “how some and not others become strangers” and “how some bodies become understood as the rightful inhabitants of certain spaces” (On Being Included, 2012). The moderator’s joke—that a suntan would make him appear as an “other”—would have been inappropriate in any professional setting, but in the particular context of an introduction to the opening keynotes at one of the major medievalist conferences in the world, this act of “stranger making” reveals an underlying assumption that the physical presence of nonwhite medievalists—and our collective years of expertise in the field on topics of “otherness”—is ignorable and extraneous to primary conversations in the field.

We emphasize that our letter is not just about any one person’s alienating comments, nor even about the conception of one problematic thread. What is at stake here is the very possibility that such a statement, like countless similar statements every day, could be made and condoned while its real harm to nonwhite medievalists was left unacknowledged and unchecked. Though such statements are sometimes made without malice or intent to harm, the harm they cause is nonetheless real—from stigmatizing individuals to foreclosing lines of scholarly inquiry. When our scholarly spaces are not welcoming to all who would practice in the field, the field loses the capacity for intellectual risk and no longer serves its primary objective: to seek a comprehensive understanding of the past in order to analyze the present and help shape the future.

The current controversy offers an opportunity for medievalists who identify as white to understand the perspectives and experiences of medievalists and other people of color. On blog posts and comments, on listservs and on Facebook, the reactions of many of our fellow scholars have been deeply disturbing, with remarks that range from dismissing such jokes as “harmless social lubricant” to accusing those who legitimately express dismay at such jokes as “policing,” “silencing,” or “blacklisting” conference speakers to violent and profanity-laden abuse directed at medievalists of color. Some comments and conversations suggest that our white medievalist colleagues experience dismay at assumptions about them based on their race: their intentions seem not to matter; they are objects of suspicion; their positions are assumed to be wrong. We ask white medievalists feeling this way to recognize that this is what is it is like to be a person of color every day, in the world and all too often in the profession. We make this point not to perpetuate a loop of mutual resentment but rather to offer an inroad to understanding our perspective. This is a watershed moment that, if used productively, will make medieval studies home to an intellectual environment that is sustainable and innovative, promotes risk-taking, and leverages an ever greater number of experiences and scholarly lenses in order to build the most comprehensive body of knowledge about the Middle Ages possible.

We, the Medievalists of Color, need our colleagues to understand the systemic racism of which we speak and the role it has continued to play in our field’s constitution and practices; to educate themselves in the critical discourses that address systemic racism both explicit and implicit; and in doing so to move past preoccupations with individual intentions. Chafing at the accusation of racism is illogical: systemic racism dictates that we are all entangled in its articulations and practices. The most damaging consequence of systemic racism is not that one might stand accused of racism; it is the harm—historically manifested on a continuum from rhetorical to psychological to physical violence—done to persons of color. Were more constituents of medieval studies to educate themselves in the critical theory of race, we could all actively address these harmful impacts in ways hitherto not possible in the field of medieval studies.

Indeed, the intellectual and ethical protocols of our discipline require us to immerse ourselves in relevant scholarly discourses. No medievalist working on Western Europe would dare discuss the term “nation” without consulting Patrick Geary’s Before France and Germany. No medievalist working on medieval memory would ignore the work of Mary Carruthers in the Book of Memory. We affirm that the same ethic of scholarly rigor applies to critical race studies and to the discussion of race, ethnicity, nationhood, and “otherness” because these topics are crucial to both the content and the professional conduct of medieval studies. Even, and especially, if we find that the scholarly paradigms of critical race and ethnic studies, postcolonialism, and decolonization do not speak fully to the historical moments we study, we are obligated to enter, and even expand, the conversations they engender. If we wish medieval studies to engage meaningfully in the modern world of which it is a product, and in which it is an agent, then medievalists must also rigorously engage with the fields that examine the ideologies and distributions of power that define the modern world. When medievalists endeavor to understand systemic racism, medieval studies becomes a stronger field whose constituents together have far greater resources for analyzing the past and present while shaping the future.

We aim our attention toward the survival and future of the study of the Middle Ages, which we must continuously work to separate from its links to nationalist and white supremacist impulses. At a time when such impulses have increased the rates of violence—rhetorical, psychological, and physical—in the US, UK, Europe, and elsewhere, we must ensure that the conditions for violence are not fostered within medieval studies. Indeed, medieval studies must form a bulwark against such conditions. We wish to foster a medieval studies whose members respond to one another, even in disagreement, with the responsibility to be ethical, compassionate, and well informed about the systems in which we operate in order that medieval studies will be a space for free intellectual inquiry—for all medievalists. Race has always mattered to medieval studies, and scholars of color play key roles in the field’s past, present, and future.

We intervene, putting ourselves at professional risk and in the path of potential aggression and hostility, because of the meaning this field holds for us, the stakes we have in it, and our commitment to contributing productively to its continued viability. We intervene for the sake of the innovative space medieval studies has at times been, and can increasingly be. We intervene to protect the powerful lessons that the Middle Ages holds for the modern world, and because we believe that deep and considered knowledge of the Middle Ages, with rigorous scholarly practices, can help realize a future in which the world is a better place—for medievalists and non-medievalists alike.

—A Fellowship of Medievalists of Color
medievalistsofcolor@gmail.com

FURTHER INFORMATION AND RESOURCES

For additional professional responses to the “Otherness” thread at the International Medieval Congress, see the article in the Chronicle of Higher Education, the open letter and petition by the President-Elect of the Shakespeare Association of America (SAA), and two letters from the President of the Society for Medieval Feminist Scholarship (SMFS).

For resources pertaining to the intellectual and professional significance of race in medieval studies, see this bibliography of scholarship on race and medieval studies, the special issue of the journal postmedieval on “Making Race Matter in the Middle Ages,” the plenary session on “The Color of Membership” held at the SAA Meeting in April 2017, the workshop on Whiteness in Medieval Studies (held at the International Congress of Medieval Studies in Kalamazoo, MI, May 2017), as well as its participant reflections and organizer reflection.

Event: Adjacent, Alternative, and Post-Academic Careers in and around Classics

[reposted from the WCC UK]
Adjacent, Alternative, and Post-Academic Careers in and around Classics
8th September 2017
University of Birmingham
Supported by the Women’s Classical Committee UK
 
A *limited* number of places remain for this day of workshops and discussion groups to highlight the many and varied careers, jobs, pursuits, and opportunities that lie around and beyond an academic career.
We hope to build both confidence and a community at this event by making a space to share a variety of post-PhD and early-career experiences and reflect on action that can be taken in the immediate and near future. The focus will be on empowering participants to see and seek out employment that values their particular skills and interests.
As with all WCC events, travel bursaries will be available for students and the un/under-employed (further details on applications for these below).

PROGRAMME
10.30-11am            Coffee and Registration
11-11.30am          Welcome and introduction
11.30-12.30pm        We have skills!
Making your CV work beyond academia – a CV workshop with Chris Packham and Holly Prescott (University of Birmingham).

Lunch

1.15-2pm                 Getting Creative 
Sharing ideas on how to build a classicist/classical identity beyond academia, with LJ Trafford (author of The Four Emperors series), followed by a workshop session with material provided by Donna Yates (Lecturer in Antiquities Trafficking and Art Crime at the University of Glasgow and creator of @LegoAcademics).
2-2.45pm                 Classics and Public Learning
The opportunities for academics in non-academic institutions, with Marianne Bergeron (Ashmolean Museum) and Andrew Roberts (English Heritage).

Tea

3-4pm                      Taking Classicists to School
Careers in teaching, outreach and HE administration, with Frances Child, Tamsin Cross, Oonagh Pennington-Wilson, Cressida Ryan, and Polly Stoker.
4-4.15pm Discussion and end

Attendance is free for WCC UK members, £10 for non-members (to cover catering costs).
If you would like to attend this event please register via Eventbrite here.
To apply for a travel bursary, please email lucy.jackson@kcl.ac.uk by August 10th at the latest with a short paragraph detailing your projected travel costs, any institutional affiliation and confirmation of student/unwaged/under-waged status.