Latin Teaching Position: Classics Dept at The Episcopal Academy

https://www.episcopalacademy.org/news-post-details/~post/classics-teacher-20210305

The Position

The Classics Department at The Episcopal Academy is looking to hire a Latin teacher for the 2021-2022 academic year. We are looking for a new colleague who is passionate about Classics and eager to share that enthusiasm with middle and upper school students. With courses offered in grades 7 through 12, our department is keen to add a versatile colleague to our collaborative and collegial team who is equally capable of teaching dynamic introductory courses alongside advanced and AP courses.

Who You Are

Making Latin accessible to all students and meeting them where they are have enabled us to grow the number of students taking Latin in recent years. A colleague with the following will be the most helpful to us as we look to continue this upward trend:

  • Pedagogical approach that embraces the reading method and use of texts such as the Oxford Latin Course and the Cambridge Latin Courses
  • Deep and varied teaching tool kit that includes project-based learning and various forms of authentic assessment
  • A student-centered approach to teaching and learning, with an emphasis on making the curriculum relevant and meaningful to middle and upper school students
  • Interest in running clubs and activities related to Classics
  • Deep commitment to building and sustaining inclusive learning spaces
  • Ability to teach Greek a plus, but certainly not required
Who We Are

While each employee at Episcopal brings a unique set of competencies and skills to their work, we believe all employees should:

  • Be student-centered, embraces school and life and shows it through actions and interactions with students, colleagues, and parents.
  • Embody and live The Stripes.
  • Consistently maintain high standards for his or her own work and motivates others to achieve the same standard of excellence.
  • Demonstrate a desire and willingness to constantly grow and learn, both personally and professionally, and sees others – especially students – as having the ability to learn and reach success.
  • Foster a positive culture by being optimistic, selfless, flexible, and collaborative.
  • Demonstrate a belief in and commitment to fostering an inclusive and diverse school community.
How to Apply

Interested candidates should submit a cover letter, current resume, and list of three references as pdf documents to jobs@episcopalacademy.org. Please include “Classics Faculty” in the subject line.

Position Term Begins: 2021-2022 School Year

The Episcopal Academy seeks candidates who hope to help foster a school environment where all people are valued and where all perspectives are respected and appreciated, as described in our Diversity and Inclusion statement.

CFP: Classics and Social Justice SCS 2022

Organizers: Amit Shilo (UC, Santa Barbara), Lindsey Mazurek (Indiana University, Bloomington)

Recent discussions in Classical Studies, including the Our Voices and Res Difficiles conferences, AIA’s diversity webinars, the Everyday Orientalism discussion series, and our own Classics and Civic Activism Workshop at the 2019 SCS Annual Meeting, have argued for a more activist approach to issues of equity in the discipline. But activism is not solely a modern concern. We can find examples of community-based interventions in antiquity as well, such as, arguably, Spartacus’ revolt, Greek and Roman land reform movements, or Lysistrata’s strike. 

In this affiliated group panel the Classics and Social Justice group endeavors to build on activist work through talks that link contemporary activism with movements and ideas in the Greek and Roman worlds. We are interested in continuing to bring scholarship into dialogue with activist practice and critiques, and seek a wide range of papers that deal with questions of activism in antiquity and in the present day, broadly defined. 

Paper topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • proposing new ways of looking at ancient movements for land and wealth redistribution or revolts of enslaved people in the light of recent movements calling for reparations, criminal justice reform, education reform, and leveling income inequality
  • examining how modern debates concerning democracy affect thinking about organizing and agitating in the classical world
  • conversely, analyzing what classical models, theories, and historical events add as paradigms or warnings for activism today
  • Decentering Classics through activism
  • Offering self-reflexive critiques of activism in the Classics 
  • critiquing the applicability of modern paradigms of activism to the ancient world
  • presenting specific public-facing outreach projects that use Classics
  • presenting specific educational policy advocacy efforts that use Classics
  • presenting activism connected to museums and archaeology
  • examining the role of teacher and student activism in the Classics classroom

Abstracts are welcome from all SCS/AIA members and will be anonymously selected.

Please send abstracts for 20-minute talks (up to 350 words) to Nancy Rabinowitz (nrabinow@hamilton.edu) by February 15, 2021.

CFP: Res Diff 2.0 (20 March 2021)

CALL FOR PAPERS
Res Difficiles 2.0
A Digital Conference 
On Challenges and Pathways 
for Addressing Inequity 
In Classics

Organizers:  Hannah Čulík-Baird (Boston University) and Joseph Romero (University of Mary Washington)
Date:  Saturday, March 20, 2021
Platform: Webinar

ResDiff 1.0 was timely respite in the midst of a pandemic that forced us to change whether and how we convene and exacted costs disproportionately in underserved communities by reinforcing the durable inequities that have come to define our times.  What was conceived as an intimate gathering on the campus of Mary Washington for those teaching Classics was transformed into a digital event attracting 250 registrants from twelve countries.  In our papers and conversations, we explored how people on the margins in our texts and contexts are invited—or pushed further from—the center, and explored avenues through with such marginalization might be addressed. Following the conference, recordings of the presentations were made available online at resdifficiles.com. Furthermore, a selection of those papers is being prepared for publication in a co-edited series of consecutive issues in Ancient History Bulletin which will start to appear in 2021.

Though tempted to narrow our focus to any one of the critical issues in and surrounding the discipline, we elected to maintain the furry and broad welcome to a Classics community that clearly needs to talk.  In this second wholly digital conference, we shall once again examine the challenges presented by this curriculum with students who are increasingly more diverse in gender identity, race, ethnicity, income, family structure, and more.  And while the society of our conference will examine pedagogical issues, we hope again to dilate outward to broader issues in education and society from (a) the current and future roles of Classics and the humanities in K-12 and higher education to (b) the ultimate goals of education. We invite papers from all those who study and teach the ancient world. 

Our keynote speaker will be Patrice Rankine, Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Classics at the University of Richmond.

The conference will be hosted as a Zoom webinar with a capacity of 500. Please note that the time zone of the conference will be US Eastern. 

Abstracts of 350 words should be sent electronically to Joseph Romero (jromero@umw.edu) by January 8, 2021.  Papers will be 20-25 minutes with coordinated discussion at the end of each session.  Any questions regarding abstract submission may be addressed to Professors Romero or Čulík-Baird (culik@bu.edu).  For more information see resdifficiles.com.

Bard College Academic Diversity Postdoctoral Fellow, Classical Studies

Employer Website: http://apply.interfolio.com/80574


The Classical Studies Program at Bard College invites applications for its newly-established academic diversity postdoctoral fellowship. Applicants for this position may specialize in any aspect of the literature, material culture, or history of Greece, Rome, or the wider Mediterranean world. They should also be committed to excellence in undergraduate teaching and to participating in the intellectual life of a small Liberal Arts College. Eligible candidates will have received the PhD in the past three years, or may still be ABD, with a clear pathway to completion, at the time they take up the fellowship. 

The purpose of the fellowship is to help advance the academic careers of promising early-stage teacher-scholars while increasing the diversity and enriching the intellectual vitality of our small, interdisciplinary Program and of the wider Bard College community. We are especially interested in receiving applications from individuals who are members of groups that historically have been underrepresented in the professoriate (including, but not limited to, Black, African American, Asian American, Native American, Indigenous, or Latinx candidates), and/or individuals whose experience, teaching, or research will contribute to diversity, inclusion and equal opportunity in the field of Classical Studies. 

The fellowship is for a period of two years, beginning July 1, 2021. The teaching load is 1-1. The fellowship comes with a full-time salary, health benefits, and research funds of $2,000 per year, as well as additional funds and institutional support to organize an academic conference at Bard during the term of the fellowship. The Fellow will be provided with office space, a computer, and library access.  
The Classical Studies Program at Bard College comprises four full-time faculty members, as well as affiliated members in other academic programs. For more about our Program, please visit: https://classicalstudies.bard.edu.  

Candidates should send the following application materials by Interfolio here:  curriculum vitae; letter of application that outlines research plans for the fellowship term as well as the candidate’s interests in and approach to undergraduate teaching; the names and contact information of three recommenders; and a personal statement of their demonstrated commitment to diversity and inclusive excellence in Classical Studies (1-3 pages). Further materials, such as a sample of scholarly work and sample syllabi, may be solicited at a later point. Review of applications will begin on December 15 and will continue until the position is filled. For questions about the position, please email Lauren Curtis, Associate Professor of Classical Studies (lcurtis@bard.edu).

Bard College is an equal opportunity employer and we welcome applications from those who contribute to our diversity. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, mental, or physical disability, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, familial status, veteran status, or genetic information.

Bard is committed to providing access, equal opportunity, and reasonable accommodation for all individuals in employment practices, services, programs, and activities.

University of Victoria Three Year Limited Appointment, Greek Archaeology

Greek and Roman Studies, Three Year Limited Appointment, Greek Archaeology

The Department of Greek and Roman Studies at the University of Victoria (http://web.uvic.ca/grs)

 invites applications from talented scholars for a Limited Term Position at the rank of Assistant Professor commencing July 1, 2021 and concluding June 30, 2024. Qualified candidates will hold a PhD in ancient Greek archaeology.   

The position requires active, high quality scholarship in Greek archaeology demonstrated by an established research program; the successful candidate will have a strong research pipeline including research targeted to high quality journals.  The Department requires a candidate with a demonstrated record of securing external research funding. The position also requires active fieldwork and leadership roles in archaeological excavation, and the Department is particularly interested in a colleague who is engaged with the broader role of archaeology in cultural contexts.  

The Department requires experience teaching courses in Greek art and archaeology, and particularly the ability to teach courses on the city of Athens, early Greece, and cultural contact in the ancient Mediterranean.  The successful candidate will be expected to supervise undergraduate Honours theses.  In addition, the position requires the ability or experience to participate in the Department’s graduate program by teaching a graduate level survey in Greek archaeology and the supervision of graduate students.  

Furthermore, engagement with issues of multiculturalism, diversity, class, gender, or imperialism and colonialism in Greek archaeology will be considered assets. Other assets for the position include experience leading or assisting in organizing studies abroad such as GRS 395: Classical Studies Abroad and/or GRS 495: Practicum in Archaeology and the ability to teach ancient Greek.   

The position also requires engagement with the activities of the Department including willingness to serve on appropriate committees, professionalism and collegiality, and the demonstrated ability to work collaboratively in an academic unit.  Additional assets would include the ability to serve as a role model and/or mentor for students and a track record addressing equity, diversity and inclusion.  

Please send by e-mail a completed application package including a cover letter which addresses the full scope of the job requirements, along with your curriculum vitae, appropriate evidence of scholarship and research (two to five representative research publications and work in progress) and evidence of teaching skills which includes evidence of the ability to teach to a diverse student body with a range of perspectives, experiences and cultures and cultural sensitivity (a teaching dossier including statements, syllabi, evaluation data).  In addition, please provide three confidential letters of reference addressing research, teaching and service strengths.   

For full consideration, all materials must be submitted by December 1, 2020 to Dr. Ingrid Holmberg, Chair, at grschair@uvic.ca:

We acknowledge with respect the Songhees, Esquimalt and WSANEC peoples on whose traditional territory the university stands and whose historical relationships with the land continue to this day.

The University of Victoria is consistently ranked in the top tier of Canada’s research-intensive universities. Vital impact drives the UVic sense of purpose. As an internationally renowned teaching and research hub, we tackle essential issues that matter to people, places and the planet. Situated in the Pacific Rim, our location breeds a profound passion for exploration. Defined by its edges, this extraordinary environment inspires us to defy boundaries, discover, and innovate in exciting ways. It’s different here, naturally and by design. We live, learn, work and explore on the edge of what’s next—for our planet and its peoples. Our commitment to research-inspired dynamic learning and vital impact make this Canada’s most extraordinary environment for discovery and innovation. Experience the edge of possibilities for yourself.

UVic is committed to upholding the values of equity, diversity, and inclusion in our living, learning and work environments. In pursuit of our values, we seek members who will work respectfully and constructively with differences and across levels of power. We actively encourage applications from members of groups experiencing barriers to equity. Read our full equity statement here: http://www.uvic.ca/equitystatement 

The University acknowledges the potential impact that career interruptions can have on a candidate’s record of research achievement. We encourage applicants to explain in their application the impact that career interruptions have had on their record. 

Persons with disabilities, who anticipate needing accommodation for any part of the application and hiring process, may contact Faculty Relations and Academic Administration in the Office of the VP Academic and Provost at FRrecruit@uvic.ca. Any personal information provided will be maintained in confidence. 

Faculty and Librarians at the University of Victoria are governed by the provisions of the Collective Agreement. Members are represented by the University of Victoria Faculty Association (www.uvicfa.ca). 

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; in accordance with Canadian Immigration requirements, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority. Please indicate in your application package if you are a Canadian citizen or permanent resident.

CFP: Classics and Race

Classical Memories Modern Identities Series
Editors, Richard Armstrong and Paul Allen Miller

With cautious optimism, we hope the current anti-racism protests will provoke moves toward equity and justice. But how did we get to this moment? How can Classics help us process a historical and scholarly legacy of white supremacy? As a recent article stated, “Classics can and should be seen as a field with diverse origins and a rich history of contributions, interpretations, and reinterpretations by people of all races. It is not the heritage of one group of people to the exclusion of another, and it cannot be used to form the bedrock of a white supremacist ideology.” The editors of the Classical Memories/Modern Identities Series seek innovative scholarship that focuses on fully mapping out the racial complexities of the ancient world and how they relate to our time. We are looking for works that reflect on the contributions of African-Americans, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian Pacific Islander Desi American (APIDA), and other underrepresented groups in the field of Classics. We are also searching for works that investigate the archaeology of Classics as a discipline, the complexities and compromises of its formation and development, its appropriation by and for racist agendas, and its deployment as a tool of resistance.

The series is already dedicated to exploring how the classical world has been variously interpreted, transformed, and appropriated to forge a usable past and a livable present. Books published in this series detail both the positive and negative aspects of classical reception and take an expansive view of the topic. Thus it includes works that examine the function of translations, adaptations, invocations, and classical scholarship in personal, cultural, national, sexual, and racial formations. Please email Ana Maria Jimenez-Moreno at the Ohio State University Press for more information.

CFP: Global Antiquities (Journal)

Call for Papers

Global Antiquities

LAUNCHING IN 2020!

Global Antiquities (GA) is a peer-reviewed, open-access journal dedicated to promoting academic work at the crossroads of Classics and Global Studies. The journal aims to publish research that engages scholars of ancient and modern worlds in dialogue about globalization and its effects, both historical and contemporary. Poverty, war, xenophobia, nationalism, migration, terrorism, imperialism, racism: these are major issues in global history shaped powerfully by the contexts in which they occur. GA welcomes submissions of research articles, book reviews, review articles, translations, and commentaries by scholars across disciplines seeking to understand and illuminate global issues through time, from antiquity to the present day.

Global Antiquities is edited by an international editorial team, supported by a distinguished and diverse advisory board.

Visit https://globalantiquities.pitt.edu/GA/about/editorialTeam for details.

NOW INVITING SUBMISSIONS

Global Antiquities invites submissions from Classicists, Ancient Historians, Archaeologists, and scholars in related fields, whose research is in dialogue with contemporary Globalization Studies. We also welcome papers from post-Classical Historians, Political Scientists, Theorists, and Philosophers, Anthropologists, Sociologists, and other social scientists and humanists whose work on global issues engages with the ancient past.

We view as “global” those features of human societies throughout history that cross real or imagined boundaries (geographic, chronological, cultural) and destabilize the primacy of the “state” or “nation” as the fundamental unit of analysis in world history. These “global” features are sometimes described processually as “flows” or “movements”, at other times statically as “systems” or “structures”. We seek work that challenges historical narratives of separateness rooted in a national imaginary, with narratives of interconnectivity and mobility made possible by globalization. Global Antiquities therefore invites submissions on a broad range of topics including (but not limited to):

  • poverty, inequality, enslavement, human rights
  • war, peace, terrorism, diplomacy
  • state formation and development; interstate networks, commerce, and governance
  • ancient and modern identities (esp. the role of antiquity in configuring post-Classical identities)
  • perceptions and expressions of difference (e.g. in gender, race, religion, ethnicity, ability, nationality, sexual identity, etc.)
  • nationalism, indigeneity, citizenship, xenophobia
  • migration, mobility, displacement
  • center, border, and periphery
  • constructions and propagations of culture (esp. across borders)
  • illness and public health (including mental health); disability studies
  • imperialisms; colonization; exploration and geography
  • climate change, the environment, environmental justice
  • organization, structures, and movement of knowledge; technology in society
  • social movements and activism
  • transnational organizations (including criminal) and movements
  • perceptions of and attendance to basic needs and threats thereto (e.g. drought, famine)

In addition, the editorial team also welcomes proposals for edited special issues bringing together cross-disciplinary articles on a single subject. Prospective editors should contact the journal staff for proposal guidelines and further instructions.

HOW TO SUBMIT

Full guidelines for authors are available at https://globalantiquities.pitt.edu/GA/about/submissions

To submit your paper online go to https://globalantiquities.pitt.edu/GA/submission/wizard

SUBSCRIBE

Visit https://globalantiquities.pitt.edu/GA to subscribe and register for email alerts!

MORE INFORMATION

For further details visit the journal homepage at https://globalantiquities.pitt.edu/GA

Michigan Humanities Emerging Research Scholars (MICHHERS) program. Deadline Feb. 7th 2020

This summer research experience, running from Sunday, June 7, to Saturday, June 20, 2020, will help students learn about the various fields within their chosen discipline along with the latest methodologies and developments from faculty in individual department. Participants will have the opportunity to work on a research project under the guidance of U-M faculty and current graduate students. Additionally,they will participate in department seminars, hear from graduate students about their experience and socialize with members of the program.  A graduate admissions workshop and social gatherings will round out the event. Our fourteen day program will host talented students (juniors, seniors and those currently in terminal MA programs), particularly those from backgrounds traditionally underrepresented in graduate education who are interested in pursuing a Ph.D. in Asian Languages and Literatures, Classical Studies, English, History, Linguistics, Romance Languages and Literatures, qualitative Sociology and any humanities field in Women’s Studies. For more information, and to apply to participate in this program, please go to:http://www.rackham.umich.edu/michhers
The application deadline is February 7, 2020.  Travel, lodging, and on campus meals of students attending will be fully paid. Participants will also receive a modest stipend of $1,000. In addition, students who subsequently apply to U-M will receive application fee waivers.

Michigan’s Department of N.N. and the Rackham Graduate School are committed to diversity in graduate education.  I would be grateful if you could forward this information and the attached announcement to interested and eligible students, as well as colleagues who may be aware of students who would be interested in participating.Please let me know if you have any questions.

Best, Sara Ahbel-Rappe
rappe@umich.edu
Classical Studies
MICHHERS Liason
 
 

CFP: (Re)inventing Sappho: New Approaches to Sappho from the Greek Fragments to the Twenty-First Century

(Re)inventing Sappho: New Approaches to Sappho from the Greek Fragments to the Twenty-First Century

Panel at the 13th Celtic Conference in Classics

(Lyon, France, 15-18 July 2020)

Proposal submission deadline: 6th March 2020

Confirmed Speakers:

  • Sandra Boehringer (Université de Strasbourg)
  • Jacqueline Fabre-Serris (Université Charles-de-Gaulle Lille 3)
  • Ellen Greene (The University of Oklahoma)
  • Andre Lardinois (Radboud University)
  • Thea Selliaas Thorsen (Norwegian University of Science and Technology)

Sappho’s manifold afterlives since antiquity have endowed her with a range of personas, going from the canonical and iconic, to the comical and the perverse. Spanning creative and scholarly responses to the poet, these various interpretations, (re)adaptations and (re)constructions have produced a “Sappho” who is now as fluid and queer as she has ever been. Concurrently, recent Sappho scholarship, as well as discoveries of new fragments, have given rise to several new methodologies and perspectives, including interdisciplinary, comparative, philological, and reception-based approaches. Our panel aims to embrace this plurality by bringing these contrasting methodologies into productive conversation with one another. By re-examining the notion of who (and what) Sappho is, this panel will problematise the “invention” of Sappho and resituate her, along with her poetic fragments and later receptions, in contemporary scholarly discourse.

We welcome papers in the fields of Classics, Ancient History, and Reception Studies, with a preference for talks which fully and boldly engage with new approaches to Sappho’s life, work, and reception. In keeping with the bilingual tradition of the Celtic Conference in Classics, and this year’s venue (Lyon), we are especially keen on contributions about the reception of Sappho by French poets, scholars and translators, as well as Francophone feminist writers such as Wittig, Kristeva and Irigaray. The panel will be fully bilingual and we therefore accept papers both in French and English. Papers might fall within but are not limited to the following categories:

  • Sappho’s fragments

  • Sappho as a historical personage

  • Sappho and literary theory, queer theory, feminist theory, and other ideological approaches

  • Ancient, medieval, or modern receptions of Sappho, including theatrical re-adaptations, Sappho in pedagogy and education, and multimedial representations of Sapphic poetry

  • The role played by Sappho within LGBTQ+ communities and literature

To encourage a variety of approaches, we will welcome two different paper lengths: 20 minutes and 40 minutes. Please, submit a proposal of 300 words for a 20-minute paper and 500 words for the 40-minute option. Abstracts must be written either in French or English. The submission deadline for abstracts is 6th March 2020.

Submissions and queries should be directed to the following address: reinventingsappho@gmail.com.

Please, include a short biography and specify your affiliation in the body of your email: attach the abstract as a separate file with no personal identification.

Notification of acceptance will be given in early April.

 

For further information on the Celtic Conference in Classics, please refer to the conference permanent website: www.celticconferenceinclassics.org.

The panel convenors

  • Astrid Khoo (Harvard University)
  • Simona Martorana (Durham University)
  • Amy Pistone (Gonzaga University)
  • Rioghnach Sachs (King’s College London)

Classics and Social Justice at the 2020 AIA/SCS

Please let me know (amypistone at gmail dot com) if I’ve missed anything organized by our members or of interest to our members. We will continue to update this post up until the conference.

I would also encourage you to check out MRECC’s listing of papers of interest, available here.

Meeting and Social Events

(will be updated once the full schedules are available online)

Friday, 12 – 1 pm: Mountaintop Coalition Business Meeting (Gallaudet)

Friday evening: WCC/LCC Reception

Saturday, 2 – 3:15pm: Classics and Social Justice Open Meeting (University of D.C. room)

Saturday, 9 – 11pm: MRECC Reception

You can help sponsor reception refreshments!


Thursday, January 2

3:30 – 5:30pm: Dr. Robin DiAngelo, “White Fragility: Why is it So Hard for White People to Talk about Race?” (Independence Ballroom Salon B+C)

Friday, January 3

Joint Workshop on Bystander Training/Intervention

Responding to Harassment: Bystander Intervention (Workshop led by Collective Action for Save Spaces, D.C. Organized by Sarah Teets, University of Virginia, and Erika Zimmermann Damer, University of Richmond)

[This same event will be held three times throughout the day, each time beginning at the start of each Friday paper session]

1:45 – 4:45 pm: Classics and Civic Activism Workshop (Joint AIA-SCS Workshop)

Organized by T. H. M. Gellar-Goad, Yurie Hong, Amit Shilo, and Marina Haworth

Featuring representatives from Indivisible Guide, National Humanities Alliance, and the American Federation of Teachers

Kim McMurray (The Indivisible Guide, Electoral Organizing Director): Advocacy and Organizing 101 with the Indivisible Guide
Alexandra Klein (National Humanities Alliance, Communications Manager): Academia and Public Policy Advocacy
Lindsay Theo (American Federation of Teachers): Teachers, Contingent Faculty, and Civic Organizing

Additional Speakers for Session #28 (Lightning Round)
Kiran Mansukhani: Repurposing Classical Pedagogy for Philippine Land Rights Activism
Wynter Pohlenz Telles Douglas: Prison Abolition and the History of Slavery
Olga Faccani: The Odyssey Project: Performing Homer with Incarcerated Youth
Emily Allen-Hornblower: Greek Tragedy and the Formerly Incarcerated: Dialogues with the Broader Public
Kristina Chew: Using Greek Poetry and Drama to Advocate for Individuals with Developmental and Intellectual Disabilities
Arti Mehta: Social Programs and Food Insecurity in Juvenal
Dan-el Padilla Peralta: Humanities Prep
Jerise Fogel: Community Bookstores and Community Organizing

1:45 – 4:45 pm: Black Classicism in the Visual Arts

Organized by Eos: Africana Receptions of Ancient Greece and Rome, Mathias Hanses, Caroline Stark, Harriet Fertik, and Sasha-Mae Eccleston

Margaret Day Elsner: Sugar Baby’s Riddle: Sphinx or Sibyl?
Samuel Agbamu: Metamorphoses in Boots Riley’s Sorry to Bother You (2018)
Stefani Echeverria-Fenn: When and Where I (Don’t) Enter: Afro-Pessimism, the Fungible Object, and Black Queer Representations of Medusa
Tom Hawkins: Centaurs and Equisapiens
Stuart McManus: Frank M. Snowden, Jr. and the Origins of the Image of the Black in Western Art
Michele Valerie Ronnick: “Every Time I Think about Color It’s a Political Statement:” Classical Elements in the Art of Emma Amos
Shelley Haley: Response

1:45 – 4:45 pm: Lesbianism Before Sexuality

Organized by the Lambda Classical Caucus, Kirk Ormand, and Kristina Milnor

Irene Han: Les Guérillères: Sappho and the Lesbian Body
Kelly McArdle: Rethinking Julia Balbilla: Queer Poetics on the Memnon Colossus
Rebecca Flemming: “I Clitorize, You Clitorize, They Clitorize…”: The Anatomy of Female Homoeroticism in the Roman Empire
Rachel Lesser: Sappho’s Mythic Models: Figuring Lesbian Desire through Heterosexual Paradigms
Kristin Mann: Tribad Philaenis and Lesbian Bassa: WLW in Martial
Sandra Boehringer: Response

5:30 – 10:30 pm: Black Classicism and the Visual Arts, a panel, reception, and Art Exhibition (organized by EOS: Africana Receptions of Greece and Rome)

Located at Busboys and Poets (450 K St. NW, Washington, D.C. 20001)

Saturday, January 4

8 – 10:30am: Classical Reception in Contemporary Asian and Asian American Culture

Organized by Christopher Waldo and Elizabeth Wueste

Christopher Waldo: Introduction
Stephanie Wong: Princess Turandot, an Occidental Oriental
Kelly Nguyen: No One Knows His Own Stock: Ocean Vuong’s Reception of Telemachus and Odysseus
Kristina Chew: Translating the Voices of Tragedy’s “Other” Women: Theresa Has Kyung Cha’s Dictee and Seneca’s Phaedra
Priya Kothari: A Palimpsest of Performance: The Construction of Classicism in the Vallabha Tradition
Melissa Mueller: Response

10:45am – 12:45pm: Citizenship, Migration, and Identity in Classical Athens

Organized by Jennifer T. Roberts

Justin Yoo: Introduction
Rebecca Futo Kennedy: Environment-Based Identity and Athenian Anti-Immigrant Policies in the Classical Period
Naomi Campa: Power Struggles: Neaira and the Threat to Citizenship
Mary Jean McNamara: Plataean Citizenship: Dual Identities
Jennifer Roberts: Immigration and Exclusion: A Comparative Study
Konstantinos Kapparis: Response

12:15 – 1:45pm: Roundtable Discussion Session

Hestia BU Graduate Pedagogy (Organized by Alicia Matz, Shannon DuBois, and Ian Nurmi)
White Supremacy and the History of Future of Classics (Organized by Curtis Dozier)

1:45 – 4:45pm: Women in Rage, Women in Protest: Feminist Approaches to Ancient Anger (Seminar)

Organized by Erika L. Weiberg and Mary Hamil Gilbert

Suzanne Lye: Putting Pressure on the Patriarchy: The Subversive Power of Women’s Anger in Ancient Greek Literature and Magic
Erika L. Weiberg: The Problem of the Angry Woman and Herodotus’ Use of Tragedy in Two Athenian Logoi
Ellen Cole Lee: Irata Puella: Gaslighting, Violence, and Anger in Elegy
Mary Hamil Gilbert: Furor Frustrated: Policing Women’s Anger in the Pseudo-Senecan Octavia

1:45 – 4:45pm: Global Receptions 

Cynthia Damon, presiding

David Wray: “Learned Poetry,” Modernist Juxtaposition, and the Classics: Three Case Studies
Christopher Stedman Parmenter: Frank Snowden at Naukratis: Revisiting the Image of the Black in Western Art
Kathleen Noelle Cruz: Norse Gods in Tyrkland: The Manipulation of the Classical Tradition in Snorra Edda
Adriana Maria Vazquez: Dreaming of Hector in the Brazilian Neoclassical Period: Conceptualizing “Window Reception”
James R. Townshend: “Keep Quiet! You Can’t Even Read Latin!” The Satirical Purpose of Western Classics in Natsume Sōseki’s I Am a Cat

Sunday, January 5

8 am – 11 am: Beyond Reception: Addressing Issues of Social Justice in the Classroom with Modern Comparisons

Organized by David J. Wright and Lindsey A. Mazurek

Nicole Nowbahar: Using Cross-Dressing to Understand Ancient Conceptions of Gender and Identity
Curtis Dozier: Classical Antiquity and Contemporary Hate Groups
Matthew Gorey: The Reception of Classics in Hispanophone and Lusophone Cultures and Modern Imperialism
Lindsey A. Mazurek: Comparing Present and Past in the Migration Classroom
Daniel Libatique: Cultural and Historical Contingencies in Ancient and Modern Sexuality
Sam Flores: Race in Antiquity and Modernity

8 am – 11 am: Sisters Doin’ It for Themselves: Women in Power in the Ancient World and the Ancient Imaginary

Organized by the Women’s Classical Caucus, T. H. M. Gellar-Goad, and Serena S. Witzke

T. H. M. Gellar-Goad and Serena S. Witzke: Introduction
Catherine M. Draycott: If I Say that the Polyxena Sarcophagus was Designed for a Woman, Does that Make Me a TERF? Identity Politics and Power Now and Then
Alana Newman: Breaking the Glass Ceiling: Ptolemaic Faience and the Limits of Female Power
Krishni Schaefgen Burns: Cornelia’s Connections: Political Influence in Cross-Class Female Networks
Morgan E. Palmer: Always Advanced by Her Recommendations: The Vestal Virgins and Women’s Mentoring
Jessica Clark: Chiomara and the Roman Centurion
Gunnar Dumke: Basilissa, Not Mahārāni: The Indo-Greek Queen Agathokleia

11:45 am – 1:45 pm: If Classics is for Everybody, Why Isn’t Everybody in My Class? Building Bridges and Opening Doors to the Study of Classics

Organized by Elizabeth A. Bobrick and Danielle R. Bostick

Elizabeth Bobrick: Introduction
Sara Ahbel-Rappe: Increasing the Diversity of Graduate Students in Classics: The University of Michigan’s Bridge M.A. and Bridge to the Ph.D. Programs
Danielle R. Bostick: Creating Systemic Change within Existing Structures
Sonya Wurster: Integrating Diverse Cultural and Linguistic Backgrounds in the Latin Classroom, and Reconsidering the Place of Classics in Non-Western Traditions
Nina Papathanasopoulou: Expanding Classics through the Visual and Performing Arts, In and Out of the Classroom

2 – 4:30 pm: Theater of Displacement: Ancient Tragedy and Modern Refugees, Immigrants, and Migrants

Organized by Seth Jeppesen, Cecilia Peek, and Chiara Aliberti

Seth Jeppesen: Introduction
Hallie Marshall: Now We See You, Now We Don’t: Displacement, Citizenship, and Gender in Greek Tragedy
Allannah Karas: Aeschylus’ Erinyes as Suppliant Immigrants: Enchantment and Subjugation
Lana Radloff: The Sword, the Box, and the Bow: Trauma, (Dis)placement, and “New Canadians”
Sarah J. Thompson: How Sweet are Tears: The Uses of Lamentation in the Trojan Women and Queens of Syria
Chiara Aliberti: Response