Edited volume: “Teaching Classics to the Incarcerated”

The prison teaching subgroup of the Classics and Justice Affiliated Group of the SCS has been presenting work in a variety of venues over the last several years. We are now editing a volume on “Teaching Classics to the Incarcerated” for publication in the Routledge Focus Series. We are asking for the submission of brief abstracts (350 words) by March 15. If you are currently teaching in a prison or have done so in the past, we welcome your participation. We want explicitly to invite submissions from the incarcerated or formerly incarcerated.

Our hope is that the volume will offer a comprehensive overview (or at least one as comprehensive as possible) of the wide range of incarcerated individuals – male, female, or gender non-conforming; young or old; serving long sentences or about to be released; etc. – who are reading and discussing classical texts and of the different ways in which they are approaching and reinterpreting them. The essays that we are envisaging will have a length of ca. 4000 words and will present either a practical or theoretical approach.

We have already had a very positive conversation with the press, and once we have all the abstracts in, we expect to be able to submit our proposal quickly, at least by the end of April. Full essays would be due at the end of October.

If you are involved in prison teaching but do not want to write an essay, we would like to know about the program you are in. And again, submissions from the incarcerated or formerly incarcerated are especially welcome.

Thanks,

Emilio Capettini (ecapettini@classics.ucsb.edu)

Nancy Rabinowitz (nrabinow@hamilton.edu)

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Short reports on ongoing CSJ activities (January 2019)

Clara Bosak-Schroeder, Disability:

Disabled classicists had their first meetup in San Diego after sharing support and advice over Slack in the Fall of 2018. Krishni Burns (UIC) and Clara Bosak-Schroeder (UIUC) organized a panel for CAMWS 2019, “Learning Disabilities in the Classics Classroom.” Future projects include increasing accessibility in scholarly publishing and at the next AIA/SCS. To get involved or join the Slack, contact: cbosak@illinois.edu.

Nancy S. Rabinowitz, Prisons:

Since its inception, the Classics and Social Justice group has been home to those of us who are involved in prison teaching. While we have held several meetings at regional associations, and have participated in round tables at the SCS, this year saw the first SCS workshop specifically on teaching the incarcerated (see earlier blog post). This public event is the first (we hope of many) acknowledgements of the importance of this branch of social justice work in Classics: we mean it when we say classics for all!

The prison group of CSJ is about to launch an effort to find out who in the field is doing prison teaching, so that we have a fuller picture of what can be done with ancient materials. Finally, we are also planning to publish a volume on prison teaching (currently talking to Routledge). Please send materials and queries to Nancy S. Rabinowitz: nrabinow@hamilton.edu.