Spotlight on Social Justice at the 2019 ACL Centennial Institute

The 2019 ACL Centennial Institute featured a wide range of sessions that touched on themes that are important to Classics and Social Justice, from inclusive pedagogy to discussions of disability and sexual assault. Also, several of our members presented, on these topics and many others! Read on to see all the exciting things that happened at the ACL!


Faces in/of Color: Teaching Intercultural Inclusiveness
Presider: Caroline Kelly, Mitchell Community College, Statesville, North Carolina
Anne Haeckl, Kalamazoo College, Kalamazoo, Michigan

Teaching Passages on Ancient Slavery with Educational Linguistics:
The Why and How of Engaging Students in Critical Language Choice Analysis
in the Classics Classroom
Presider: Patty Lister, Thomas Jefferson High School, Alexandria, Virginia
Kelly Dugan, University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia

Orbis Latinus: A Task-based, Collaborative, Participatory,
and Inclusive Methodology for Teaching Latin
Presider: Danielle Martin, Seattle Academy of Arts and Science,
Seattle, Washington
Eduardo Engelsing, Western Washington University, Bellingham, Washington

Opportunities for Inclusion in the Latin Classroom
Presider: Andrea Weiskopf, Seneca Ridge Middle School, Sterling, Virginia
Ashley Schneider, St. Stephen’s Episcopal School, Austin, Texas

Supporting Students with Learning Disabilities and Mental Illnesses
in the Latin Classroom
Presider: Stephanie Krause, McLean School, Potomac, Maryland
Meghan Kiernan, Freehold Township High School, Freehold Township, New Jersey

The ‘Tuning the Classics’ Project: Undergraduate Classics Curricular Models
Presider: Ann Raia, The College of New Rochelle, New Rochelle, New York
Lisl Walsh, Beloit College, Beloit, Wisconsin
John Gruber-Miller, Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa

Let’s Diversify: Using African American Fiction to Bring Black
Classicism into Your Classroom
Michele Valerie Ronnick, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan

Inclusive Latin: Teaching Metacognition and Empathy through Grammar
and Translation
Presider: Jennifer Jordt, NJCL Graphics Arts Chair, Victor J. Andrew High School,
Tinley Park, Illinois
Chris Sheppard, Blair Academy, Blairstown, New Jersey

Teaching Culture in Latin: A Simple Yet Flexible Unit Template for All Levels
Presider: Amy Sommer Rosevear, Cherry Creek High School, Denver, Colorado
Lance Piantaggini, Springfield Honors Academy, Springfield, Massachusetts
John Piazza, Berkeley High School, Berkeley, California
John Bracey, Belchertown High School, Belchertown, Massachusetts

Latin When Everyone Can Do It
Presider: Rachel Ash, Parkview High School, Lilburn, Georgia
Jennifer Jarnagin, Episcopal School of Dallas, Garland, Texas
Robert Patrick, Parkview High School, Lilburn, Georgia
Rachel Ash, Parkview High School, Lilburn, Georgia
John Bracey, Belchertown High School, Belchertown, Massachusetts

From First Century Empire to Twenty-first Century Social Justice
Presider: Benjamin Joffe, The Hewitt School, New York, New York
Andrea Weiskopf, Seneca Ridge Middle School, Sterling, Virginia

Culture Matters: Active Latin in a Culture-based Curriculum
Presider: Micheal Posey, The Episcopal School of Baton Rouge,
Baton Rouge, Louisiana
Mark Pearsall, Glastonbury High School, Glastonbury, Connecticut

The Warrior Chorus: A Classics-based Veteran’s Public Program
Presider: David Jackson, Oak Hall School, Gainesville, Florida
Peter Meineck, New York University, New York, New York

Ovid in the Age of #MeToo
Sammie Smith, Heschel School, New York, New York

Comprehensible and Culturally Relevant Stories in the Latin II Classroom
Chris Buczek, Mount Mercy Academy, Buffalo, New York

Comprehensible Input Problem-Solving Workshop
Presider: Justin Slocum Bailey, Indwelling Language, Ann Arbor, Michigan
Michele Ramahlo, Seven Bridges Middle School, Chappaqua, New York
Lily Hart, Bellows Falls Union High School Westminster, Vermont

Body and Voice Techniques to Boost Engagement, Understanding,
Memory, and Health
Presider: Debra Heaton, National Latin Exam, Lexington, Massachusetts
Justin Slocum Bailey, Indwelling Language, Ann Arbor, Michigan

Quomodo discamus? Tunc et Nunc: A Century of Teaching Latin
Presider: John Gruber-Miller, Cornell College, Mount Vernon, Iowa
Ken Kitchell, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Emeritus,
Signal Mountain, Tennessee
Jared Simard, New York University, New York, New York
Robert Patrick, Parkview High School, Lilburn, Georgia
Teresa Ramsby, University of Massachusetts Amherst, Amherst, Massachusetts

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2019 FIEC/CA: Who “owns” Classics? Redefining Participation and Ownership of the Field

This panel (organized by Classics and Social Justice) focused on the question of who “owns” Classics and explored some of the implicit and explicit ways the field has marginalized specific communities. More importantly, the panel discussed the role that Classics can play in discourses about identity and offered suggestions about how classicists can promote inclusivity in their teaching and in the field more broadly.
Papers in this panel represented a range of marginalized perspectives and voices which are not often heard in discussions about “the field.”

Sonia Sabnis (Reed College, USA), The Metamorphoses in the Maghreb: Owning Apuleius in Algeria

The paper explores an Algerian “reclamation” of Apuleius in the country where his hometown, Madauros (M’Daorouch), is now located. The paper highlights how inhabitants of the Maghreb have begun to invoke Apuleius in the process of defending their own indigenous languages and traditions against outside forces. The paper takes begins with Algerian writer Assia Djebar’s praise of Apuleius’ Metamorphoses as “a picaresque novel whose spirit, freedom, and iconoclastic humor show a surprising modernity…What a revolution it would be to translate it into popular or literary Arabic, no matter, surely as a health-bringing vaccination against all the fundamentalisms of all of today’s borders.” By looking at Algerian receptions of Apuleius, the paper concludes that, by claiming Apuleius as their own, locals not only bolster their defense of their indigenous languages against Arabic and French but they also protect their indigenous traditions against powerful new currents of Islamic fundamentalism.

Clara Bosak-Schroeder (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, USA), Cripping Classics: Disability Studies and Realities

Available in PowerPoint and PDF formats

Kiran Mansukhani and Nicole Nowbahar (CUNY and Rutgers, USA), “γυμνοὺς κριτέον ἁπάντων τούτων”: A Recap of The Sportula’s Naked Soul Conference 2019

The Sportulageneral information and Go Fund Me donation details and Patreon information for recurring donations. You can also donate via Paypal at s.dixon@berkeley.edu and Venmo with the username @thesportula.

Naked Soul conference website (don’t miss the featured submissions!)

Asian and Asian American Classical Caucus (AAACC)

#nakedsoul2019 on Twitter

Sportula Free (Text)Book Exchange

Amy Pistone’s write-up of the conference

Contact info: nicolenowbahar@gmail.com and kiran.p.man@gmail.com
Sportula email: libertinopatrenatus@gmail.com