CFP: Classics and Social Justice SCS 2022

Organizers: Amit Shilo (UC, Santa Barbara), Lindsey Mazurek (Indiana University, Bloomington)

Recent discussions in Classical Studies, including the Our Voices and Res Difficiles conferences, AIA’s diversity webinars, the Everyday Orientalism discussion series, and our own Classics and Civic Activism Workshop at the 2019 SCS Annual Meeting, have argued for a more activist approach to issues of equity in the discipline. But activism is not solely a modern concern. We can find examples of community-based interventions in antiquity as well, such as, arguably, Spartacus’ revolt, Greek and Roman land reform movements, or Lysistrata’s strike. 

In this affiliated group panel the Classics and Social Justice group endeavors to build on activist work through talks that link contemporary activism with movements and ideas in the Greek and Roman worlds. We are interested in continuing to bring scholarship into dialogue with activist practice and critiques, and seek a wide range of papers that deal with questions of activism in antiquity and in the present day, broadly defined. 

Paper topics might include, but are not limited to:

  • proposing new ways of looking at ancient movements for land and wealth redistribution or revolts of enslaved people in the light of recent movements calling for reparations, criminal justice reform, education reform, and leveling income inequality
  • examining how modern debates concerning democracy affect thinking about organizing and agitating in the classical world
  • conversely, analyzing what classical models, theories, and historical events add as paradigms or warnings for activism today
  • Decentering Classics through activism
  • Offering self-reflexive critiques of activism in the Classics 
  • critiquing the applicability of modern paradigms of activism to the ancient world
  • presenting specific public-facing outreach projects that use Classics
  • presenting specific educational policy advocacy efforts that use Classics
  • presenting activism connected to museums and archaeology
  • examining the role of teacher and student activism in the Classics classroom

Abstracts are welcome from all SCS/AIA members and will be anonymously selected.

Please send abstracts for 20-minute talks (up to 350 words) to Nancy Rabinowitz (nrabinow@hamilton.edu) by February 15, 2021.

Classics and Social Justice at the 2021 SCS/AIA

If you have things that seem related to the Classics and Social Justice mission that you would like to see included here, please email amypistone at gmail dot com.

All times listed are Central Time.

Meetings and Receptions of Interest

CSJ Open Meeting: Tuesday, January 5, 5-6pm CT (access link)

WCC’s Welcome Night Reception and Awards Ceremony: Tuesday, January 5, 8 – 10pm

Pachanga Latina: A Hispanic/Latinx Faculty and Grad Student Meet and Greet: Wednesday, January 6, 6:30 – 7:30pm

Reception: MRECC and EOS’s Reception in Honor of Shelley Haley and Her Assumption of the SCS Presidency: Thursday, January 7, 8 – 9pm

Mountaintop Coalition Virtual Reception: Friday, January 8, 7:30 – 8:30pm

WCC Open Meeting: Saturday, January 9, 12 – 1pm

January 5

9am – 12pm: Classics In/Out of Asia (AAACC panel)

2 – 5pm: Ancient Theater in Chicagoland (CAMP panel)

January 6

9am – 12pm: Believing Ancient Women: A Feminist Epistemology for Greece and Rome (seminar)
You must sign-up for this seminar before it takes place. The sign-up form is available here.

January 7

2 – 5pm: Eos READS: Toni Morrison, “Unspeakable Things Unspoken: The Afro-American Presence in American Literature”
Requires pre-reading and registration. Please find the required materials to prepare for the workshop here: https://www.eosafricana.org/reads/toni-morrisons-unspeakable-things-unspoken

2 – 5pm: Classics and Childcare (workshop)

2 – 5pm: Legalize It: Gender and Sexuality in Ancient Law (LCC panel)

January 8

9am – 12pm: Indigenous Voices and Classical Literature

2 – 5pm: COVID-19 and the Future of Classics Graduate Study

5:30 – 7:30pm: Presidential Panel: William Sanders Scarborough and Black Classicism at the Turn of the Twentieth Century, organized by Sheila Murnaghan

January 9

9am – 12pm: Greco-Roman Antiquity and White Supremacy

9am – 12pm: Think of the Children!: The Reception of the Ancient World in Children’s Media (WCC panel)

2 – 5pm: Difficult Topics in the Classroom

January 10

2 – 5pm: Race, Classics, and the Latin Classroom

CFP: Res Diff 2.0 (20 March 2021)

CALL FOR PAPERS
Res Difficiles 2.0
A Digital Conference 
On Challenges and Pathways 
for Addressing Inequity 
In Classics

Organizers:  Hannah Čulík-Baird (Boston University) and Joseph Romero (University of Mary Washington)
Date:  Saturday, March 20, 2021
Platform: Webinar

ResDiff 1.0 was timely respite in the midst of a pandemic that forced us to change whether and how we convene and exacted costs disproportionately in underserved communities by reinforcing the durable inequities that have come to define our times.  What was conceived as an intimate gathering on the campus of Mary Washington for those teaching Classics was transformed into a digital event attracting 250 registrants from twelve countries.  In our papers and conversations, we explored how people on the margins in our texts and contexts are invited—or pushed further from—the center, and explored avenues through with such marginalization might be addressed. Following the conference, recordings of the presentations were made available online at resdifficiles.com. Furthermore, a selection of those papers is being prepared for publication in a co-edited series of consecutive issues in Ancient History Bulletin which will start to appear in 2021.

Though tempted to narrow our focus to any one of the critical issues in and surrounding the discipline, we elected to maintain the furry and broad welcome to a Classics community that clearly needs to talk.  In this second wholly digital conference, we shall once again examine the challenges presented by this curriculum with students who are increasingly more diverse in gender identity, race, ethnicity, income, family structure, and more.  And while the society of our conference will examine pedagogical issues, we hope again to dilate outward to broader issues in education and society from (a) the current and future roles of Classics and the humanities in K-12 and higher education to (b) the ultimate goals of education. We invite papers from all those who study and teach the ancient world. 

Our keynote speaker will be Patrice Rankine, Dean of the School of Arts and Sciences and Professor of Classics at the University of Richmond.

The conference will be hosted as a Zoom webinar with a capacity of 500. Please note that the time zone of the conference will be US Eastern. 

Abstracts of 350 words should be sent electronically to Joseph Romero (jromero@umw.edu) by January 8, 2021.  Papers will be 20-25 minutes with coordinated discussion at the end of each session.  Any questions regarding abstract submission may be addressed to Professors Romero or Čulík-Baird (culik@bu.edu).  For more information see resdifficiles.com.

Bard College Academic Diversity Postdoctoral Fellow, Classical Studies

Employer Website: http://apply.interfolio.com/80574


The Classical Studies Program at Bard College invites applications for its newly-established academic diversity postdoctoral fellowship. Applicants for this position may specialize in any aspect of the literature, material culture, or history of Greece, Rome, or the wider Mediterranean world. They should also be committed to excellence in undergraduate teaching and to participating in the intellectual life of a small Liberal Arts College. Eligible candidates will have received the PhD in the past three years, or may still be ABD, with a clear pathway to completion, at the time they take up the fellowship. 

The purpose of the fellowship is to help advance the academic careers of promising early-stage teacher-scholars while increasing the diversity and enriching the intellectual vitality of our small, interdisciplinary Program and of the wider Bard College community. We are especially interested in receiving applications from individuals who are members of groups that historically have been underrepresented in the professoriate (including, but not limited to, Black, African American, Asian American, Native American, Indigenous, or Latinx candidates), and/or individuals whose experience, teaching, or research will contribute to diversity, inclusion and equal opportunity in the field of Classical Studies. 

The fellowship is for a period of two years, beginning July 1, 2021. The teaching load is 1-1. The fellowship comes with a full-time salary, health benefits, and research funds of $2,000 per year, as well as additional funds and institutional support to organize an academic conference at Bard during the term of the fellowship. The Fellow will be provided with office space, a computer, and library access.  
The Classical Studies Program at Bard College comprises four full-time faculty members, as well as affiliated members in other academic programs. For more about our Program, please visit: https://classicalstudies.bard.edu.  

Candidates should send the following application materials by Interfolio here:  curriculum vitae; letter of application that outlines research plans for the fellowship term as well as the candidate’s interests in and approach to undergraduate teaching; the names and contact information of three recommenders; and a personal statement of their demonstrated commitment to diversity and inclusive excellence in Classical Studies (1-3 pages). Further materials, such as a sample of scholarly work and sample syllabi, may be solicited at a later point. Review of applications will begin on December 15 and will continue until the position is filled. For questions about the position, please email Lauren Curtis, Associate Professor of Classical Studies (lcurtis@bard.edu).

Bard College is an equal opportunity employer and we welcome applications from those who contribute to our diversity. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, mental, or physical disability, age, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, familial status, veteran status, or genetic information.

Bard is committed to providing access, equal opportunity, and reasonable accommodation for all individuals in employment practices, services, programs, and activities.

University of Victoria Three Year Limited Appointment, Greek Archaeology

Greek and Roman Studies, Three Year Limited Appointment, Greek Archaeology

The Department of Greek and Roman Studies at the University of Victoria (http://web.uvic.ca/grs)

 invites applications from talented scholars for a Limited Term Position at the rank of Assistant Professor commencing July 1, 2021 and concluding June 30, 2024. Qualified candidates will hold a PhD in ancient Greek archaeology.   

The position requires active, high quality scholarship in Greek archaeology demonstrated by an established research program; the successful candidate will have a strong research pipeline including research targeted to high quality journals.  The Department requires a candidate with a demonstrated record of securing external research funding. The position also requires active fieldwork and leadership roles in archaeological excavation, and the Department is particularly interested in a colleague who is engaged with the broader role of archaeology in cultural contexts.  

The Department requires experience teaching courses in Greek art and archaeology, and particularly the ability to teach courses on the city of Athens, early Greece, and cultural contact in the ancient Mediterranean.  The successful candidate will be expected to supervise undergraduate Honours theses.  In addition, the position requires the ability or experience to participate in the Department’s graduate program by teaching a graduate level survey in Greek archaeology and the supervision of graduate students.  

Furthermore, engagement with issues of multiculturalism, diversity, class, gender, or imperialism and colonialism in Greek archaeology will be considered assets. Other assets for the position include experience leading or assisting in organizing studies abroad such as GRS 395: Classical Studies Abroad and/or GRS 495: Practicum in Archaeology and the ability to teach ancient Greek.   

The position also requires engagement with the activities of the Department including willingness to serve on appropriate committees, professionalism and collegiality, and the demonstrated ability to work collaboratively in an academic unit.  Additional assets would include the ability to serve as a role model and/or mentor for students and a track record addressing equity, diversity and inclusion.  

Please send by e-mail a completed application package including a cover letter which addresses the full scope of the job requirements, along with your curriculum vitae, appropriate evidence of scholarship and research (two to five representative research publications and work in progress) and evidence of teaching skills which includes evidence of the ability to teach to a diverse student body with a range of perspectives, experiences and cultures and cultural sensitivity (a teaching dossier including statements, syllabi, evaluation data).  In addition, please provide three confidential letters of reference addressing research, teaching and service strengths.   

For full consideration, all materials must be submitted by December 1, 2020 to Dr. Ingrid Holmberg, Chair, at grschair@uvic.ca:

We acknowledge with respect the Songhees, Esquimalt and WSANEC peoples on whose traditional territory the university stands and whose historical relationships with the land continue to this day.

The University of Victoria is consistently ranked in the top tier of Canada’s research-intensive universities. Vital impact drives the UVic sense of purpose. As an internationally renowned teaching and research hub, we tackle essential issues that matter to people, places and the planet. Situated in the Pacific Rim, our location breeds a profound passion for exploration. Defined by its edges, this extraordinary environment inspires us to defy boundaries, discover, and innovate in exciting ways. It’s different here, naturally and by design. We live, learn, work and explore on the edge of what’s next—for our planet and its peoples. Our commitment to research-inspired dynamic learning and vital impact make this Canada’s most extraordinary environment for discovery and innovation. Experience the edge of possibilities for yourself.

UVic is committed to upholding the values of equity, diversity, and inclusion in our living, learning and work environments. In pursuit of our values, we seek members who will work respectfully and constructively with differences and across levels of power. We actively encourage applications from members of groups experiencing barriers to equity. Read our full equity statement here: http://www.uvic.ca/equitystatement 

The University acknowledges the potential impact that career interruptions can have on a candidate’s record of research achievement. We encourage applicants to explain in their application the impact that career interruptions have had on their record. 

Persons with disabilities, who anticipate needing accommodation for any part of the application and hiring process, may contact Faculty Relations and Academic Administration in the Office of the VP Academic and Provost at FRrecruit@uvic.ca. Any personal information provided will be maintained in confidence. 

Faculty and Librarians at the University of Victoria are governed by the provisions of the Collective Agreement. Members are represented by the University of Victoria Faculty Association (www.uvicfa.ca). 

All qualified candidates are encouraged to apply; in accordance with Canadian Immigration requirements, Canadians and permanent residents will be given priority. Please indicate in your application package if you are a Canadian citizen or permanent resident.

CFP: Classics and Race

Classical Memories Modern Identities Series
Editors, Richard Armstrong and Paul Allen Miller

With cautious optimism, we hope the current anti-racism protests will provoke moves toward equity and justice. But how did we get to this moment? How can Classics help us process a historical and scholarly legacy of white supremacy? As a recent article stated, “Classics can and should be seen as a field with diverse origins and a rich history of contributions, interpretations, and reinterpretations by people of all races. It is not the heritage of one group of people to the exclusion of another, and it cannot be used to form the bedrock of a white supremacist ideology.” The editors of the Classical Memories/Modern Identities Series seek innovative scholarship that focuses on fully mapping out the racial complexities of the ancient world and how they relate to our time. We are looking for works that reflect on the contributions of African-Americans, Indigenous, Latinx, Asian Pacific Islander Desi American (APIDA), and other underrepresented groups in the field of Classics. We are also searching for works that investigate the archaeology of Classics as a discipline, the complexities and compromises of its formation and development, its appropriation by and for racist agendas, and its deployment as a tool of resistance.

The series is already dedicated to exploring how the classical world has been variously interpreted, transformed, and appropriated to forge a usable past and a livable present. Books published in this series detail both the positive and negative aspects of classical reception and take an expansive view of the topic. Thus it includes works that examine the function of translations, adaptations, invocations, and classical scholarship in personal, cultural, national, sexual, and racial formations. Please email Ana Maria Jimenez-Moreno at the Ohio State University Press for more information.

CFP: Global Antiquities (Journal)

Call for Papers

Global Antiquities

LAUNCHING IN 2020!

Global Antiquities (GA) is a peer-reviewed, open-access journal dedicated to promoting academic work at the crossroads of Classics and Global Studies. The journal aims to publish research that engages scholars of ancient and modern worlds in dialogue about globalization and its effects, both historical and contemporary. Poverty, war, xenophobia, nationalism, migration, terrorism, imperialism, racism: these are major issues in global history shaped powerfully by the contexts in which they occur. GA welcomes submissions of research articles, book reviews, review articles, translations, and commentaries by scholars across disciplines seeking to understand and illuminate global issues through time, from antiquity to the present day.

Global Antiquities is edited by an international editorial team, supported by a distinguished and diverse advisory board.

Visit https://globalantiquities.pitt.edu/GA/about/editorialTeam for details.

NOW INVITING SUBMISSIONS

Global Antiquities invites submissions from Classicists, Ancient Historians, Archaeologists, and scholars in related fields, whose research is in dialogue with contemporary Globalization Studies. We also welcome papers from post-Classical Historians, Political Scientists, Theorists, and Philosophers, Anthropologists, Sociologists, and other social scientists and humanists whose work on global issues engages with the ancient past.

We view as “global” those features of human societies throughout history that cross real or imagined boundaries (geographic, chronological, cultural) and destabilize the primacy of the “state” or “nation” as the fundamental unit of analysis in world history. These “global” features are sometimes described processually as “flows” or “movements”, at other times statically as “systems” or “structures”. We seek work that challenges historical narratives of separateness rooted in a national imaginary, with narratives of interconnectivity and mobility made possible by globalization. Global Antiquities therefore invites submissions on a broad range of topics including (but not limited to):

  • poverty, inequality, enslavement, human rights
  • war, peace, terrorism, diplomacy
  • state formation and development; interstate networks, commerce, and governance
  • ancient and modern identities (esp. the role of antiquity in configuring post-Classical identities)
  • perceptions and expressions of difference (e.g. in gender, race, religion, ethnicity, ability, nationality, sexual identity, etc.)
  • nationalism, indigeneity, citizenship, xenophobia
  • migration, mobility, displacement
  • center, border, and periphery
  • constructions and propagations of culture (esp. across borders)
  • illness and public health (including mental health); disability studies
  • imperialisms; colonization; exploration and geography
  • climate change, the environment, environmental justice
  • organization, structures, and movement of knowledge; technology in society
  • social movements and activism
  • transnational organizations (including criminal) and movements
  • perceptions of and attendance to basic needs and threats thereto (e.g. drought, famine)

In addition, the editorial team also welcomes proposals for edited special issues bringing together cross-disciplinary articles on a single subject. Prospective editors should contact the journal staff for proposal guidelines and further instructions.

HOW TO SUBMIT

Full guidelines for authors are available at https://globalantiquities.pitt.edu/GA/about/submissions

To submit your paper online go to https://globalantiquities.pitt.edu/GA/submission/wizard

SUBSCRIBE

Visit https://globalantiquities.pitt.edu/GA to subscribe and register for email alerts!

MORE INFORMATION

For further details visit the journal homepage at https://globalantiquities.pitt.edu/GA

Letter of Support and Solidarity for Black Classicists

Classics and Social Justice welcomes the Women’s Classical Caucus as a co-signatory to this statement. 

Classics and Social Justice unequivocally supports #BlackLivesMatter. We strongly oppose the racism and state-sanctioned violence that unjustly target Black people, and we pledge our advocacy, as well as our resources, to support Black lives. We support protestors who are seeking justice and the end of police brutality and advocating for community-based restorative justice. We affirm the pain, grief, frustration, anger, and other emotions that our Black members, colleagues, and students are experiencing as a result of a society that does not recognize their full humanity.  We recognize that the privileges those of us who are white enjoy are afforded by the past and continuing oppression of Black communities.

We express our support as scholars and students of the ancient Mediterranean world, whose work notably pertains to the study of ancient imperialisms and the historical links between modern white supremacy, slavery, settler colonialism, and a Eurocentric, whitewashed understanding of Greece and Rome as the universally valid and inherently superior ‘Classics’. 

We recognize that our membership is predominantly white and that there are many groups in our field that are better able to represent the voices of Black classicists (including Mountaintop and Eos, among others). With that in mind, we ask our members (particularly our white members) to first listen and learn what we can do to best support our Black colleagues and to amplify Black voices. It is not the job of our Black colleagues to do the emotional and intellectual labor of educating anyone about how to be good allies. The resources are available, and it is incumbent on non-Black people to do the work of learning how to be anti-racists. One good place to start is by reading the Sportula’s statement of Solidarity: Statement of Solidarity with #BlackLivesMatter – The Sportula Microgrants For Classics Students.

Actions: White silence and complicity with a racist system are unacceptable. A statement of solidarity is an important first step, but it is not enough. We therefore urge fellow non-Black classicists and Classics departments to do something concrete. Constructive, helpful actions include:  

  • Donate to organizations dedicated to supporting classicists of color such as the Sportula.
  • Create an action plan in your department with concrete steps that you will take to promote #BlackLivesMatter. Advocate for your professional organizations to do the same. 
  • Include readings by Black scholars on your syllabi, particularly Black women, and Black-Centered Resources. Do so in a non tokenizing way, and emphasize the past and ongoing contributions of Black scholars to our field.
  • Organize and conduct over the upcoming academic year a series of faculty-led workshops using Black Lives Matter’s public syllabus.
  • Leverage faculty and institutional privileges by implementing a coordinated strategy for public engagement about the entanglements between anti-Black racism and the field of Classics (op-eds, twitter threads, public lectures).
  • Work with librarians to develop resource lists, open source syllabi, or a lecture series on topics such as Classics and Blackness or Classics and White Supremacy. Engage with the work of scholars around Critical Race Theory and create opportunities for your students and colleagues to do the same. 
  • Develop and execute strategies to attract and retain faculty and graduate students from Black communities by addressing the implicit and explicit barriers to Black scholarship in our discipline and institutions.
  • Use whatever pull you have in your institutions to support Black-led efforts for institutional reform beyond the departmental scale, including opposing exploitation of low-wage employees of color, supporting Black student groups, revising racist historical narratives of the institution, increasing accountability for university or school police, and any other issues facing Black members of your campus community.
  • Amplify the work and words of your Black colleagues.
  • Show up to protests, if you are able and have done the work to be a good ally at a protest. If you are white, your body gives you greater protection by virtue of our white supremacist system of policing. When joining a protest, use the privilege and protection afforded by your white body to protect others. 
  • Donate to bail funds for people who have been arrested while protesting. Here is a list of bail funds and legal help by city.
  • Develop an accountability plan to make sure that you, your department, and your colleagues are making concrete progress toward racial justice.

Here is a much larger list of resources for Accountability and Actions for Black Lives and a list of 75 Things White People Can Do for Racial Justice.

 

Listen to what Black people are asking and telling you to do. Any move toward racial justice, in the academy and in our society as a whole, will need to center Black voices. 

 

Additional resources:

Classicists in Solidarity with the Wet’suwet’en First Nation

We are cross-posting this statement to amplify the statement and hopefully reach a broader audience. The full statement is available here.

If you are a Classicist living, studying or working in North America and you wish to sign the solidarity statement below, you can still do so via this linkThe group of Classicists behind this initiative thanks the authors of the University of Toronto’s Department of Geography and Planning Solidarity with Wet’suwet’en statement, on which the following text is based.

North America-based Classicists in Solidarity with the Wet’suwet’en

We, a group of classicists living, studying and working across North America, write in the spirit of solidarity with the Wet’suwet’en First Nation, as they peacefully work to defend their sovereignty over their unceded territories. We express our support as scholars and students of the ancient Mediterranean world, whose work notably pertains to the study of ancient imperialisms and the historical link between modern settler colonialism and a Eurocentric understanding of Greece and Rome as the universally valid and inherently superior ‘Classics’. We understand our roles as educators, researchers and organizers to have specific responsibilities to Indigenous peoples’ efforts to protect their lands, waters, and peoples. continue reading >>

Michigan Humanities Emerging Research Scholars (MICHHERS) program. Deadline Feb. 7th 2020

This summer research experience, running from Sunday, June 7, to Saturday, June 20, 2020, will help students learn about the various fields within their chosen discipline along with the latest methodologies and developments from faculty in individual department. Participants will have the opportunity to work on a research project under the guidance of U-M faculty and current graduate students. Additionally,they will participate in department seminars, hear from graduate students about their experience and socialize with members of the program.  A graduate admissions workshop and social gatherings will round out the event. Our fourteen day program will host talented students (juniors, seniors and those currently in terminal MA programs), particularly those from backgrounds traditionally underrepresented in graduate education who are interested in pursuing a Ph.D. in Asian Languages and Literatures, Classical Studies, English, History, Linguistics, Romance Languages and Literatures, qualitative Sociology and any humanities field in Women’s Studies. For more information, and to apply to participate in this program, please go to:http://www.rackham.umich.edu/michhers
The application deadline is February 7, 2020.  Travel, lodging, and on campus meals of students attending will be fully paid. Participants will also receive a modest stipend of $1,000. In addition, students who subsequently apply to U-M will receive application fee waivers.

Michigan’s Department of N.N. and the Rackham Graduate School are committed to diversity in graduate education.  I would be grateful if you could forward this information and the attached announcement to interested and eligible students, as well as colleagues who may be aware of students who would be interested in participating.Please let me know if you have any questions.

Best, Sara Ahbel-Rappe
rappe@umich.edu
Classical Studies
MICHHERS Liason